NHL Issues Its 2nd Sustainability Report: Environmental Performance Improvements vs. 2014; NHL Green Goals — “Innovate, Transform, Inspire”

Four years ago, the NHL became the first pro sports league to issue a sustainability report, one of many examples of its environmental leadership. Why has the NHL made such a strong commitment? The report said it best: “Perhaps more than any other sport, hockey is impacted by environmental issues, particularly climate change and freshwater scarcity. The ability to skate and play hockey outdoors is a critical component of the [NHL’s] history and culture.” At that time, the league reported on its water and energy usage, carbon emissions and its conservation efforts.

On Wednesday, with the publication of its substantive, engaging and accessible 2018 sustainability report, the NHL provided a detailed look at how it performed on a variety of environmental metrics since 2014 and sets out how it plans to improve going forward. The goal is to ensure that all levels of hockey – from frozen ponds to community rinks to the NHL – thrive for future generations. To make good on that objective, the league promises to innovate, transform and inspire.

 

“What is the greenest sports league?”

I get that question a lot from folks outside of the Green-Sports ecosystem.

My response has always been the same and without hesitation: “The NHL.”

Why? The league:

  • Launched NHL Green in 2010, a comprehensive environmental sustainability program addressing the effects of climate change and freshwater scarcity on the sport.
  • Became the first in North America to have carbon neutral seasons by offsetting all of its direct carbon emissions starting in 2014
  • Started the Greener Rinks Initiative, providing managers of many indoor ice rinks in North America with the tools to operate in more environmentally friendly ways
  • Issued, in 2014, its first sustainability report, the first ever produced by a North American professional sports league.

I could list many more but you get the gist.

The NHL, which celebrated its centennial in 2017, takes a very long view when it comes to environmental sustainability. According to Omar Mitchell, the league’s vice president of corporate social responsibility, “We are working to make sure we ensure that we have hockey for the next 100 years. That’s why ‘Green’ is integral to our DNA.”

 

omar

Omar Mitchell, NHL’s Vice President of Corporate Responsibility (Photo credit: Claire Greenway/Getty Images Europe)

 

That big picture approach to sustainability becomes crystal clear as one navigates through the NHL’s second installation of its sustainability report.

The 2018 version is imbued with the ethos expressed in a pledge the NHL made last September’s in its Declaration of Principles, stating that: Hockey should be an enjoyable family experience; all stakeholders – organizations, players, parents, siblings, coaches, referees, volunteers and rink operations – play a role in this effort. To Mitchell, this is much more than a statement: “It is our way of stating our values. We believe hockey improves lives and communities.”

 

NHL Sustainability Scorecard: Improvements in waste diversion, energy usage and more

The report provides the reader with a detailed scorecard illustrating the league’s — and its 30 teams’ — performance over the last few years on a variety of environmental metrics, including water restoration, landfill reduction, efficient electricity use, and more. Highlights include:

  • Waste diversion rate of 32 percent thanks to composting, improved concessions forecasting, and enhanced waste tracking, with half of NHL arenas currently composting their own waste. The NHL has set a goal to increase waste diversion to 50 percent within five years.
  • A one percent reduction of energy consumption from Fiscal Year (FY)14 to FY16 by using more efficient lighting, enhanced building management systems, waste heat recapture technologies, and onsite renewable energy generation.
  • An approximate seven percent decrease in water consumption from FY15 to FY16, through fixture upgrades in arenas, minimizing consumption in water towers, and installation of smart sensors on water irrigation systems.
  • Throughout the NHL Centennial year, fans donated 4,245 pounds of equipment (more than 2,000 items), including helmets, skates, and pads. This equipment avoids landfills and gets repurposed back into the community.
  • A two percent year-over-year reduction in CO2 emissions from FY14 to FY16 – from 189,503 to 182,355 metric tons – through innovations and efficiencies.
  • 963,200 megawatt hours of energy counterbalanced since 2014 through the investment of renewable energy credits, generated from U.S. wind and Canadian biomass.

 

Bringing sustainability to community rinks and pond hockey lovers

The NHL’s Greener Rinks Initiative, a program launched in 2016, is prominently featured. With approximately 4,800 indoor ice rinks across North America, the initiative measures and evaluates their environmental impact. Modern-day NHL arenas use more environmentally-friendly energy sources, including solar power, fuel cell technology, waste water recapture and reuse, and geothermal technologies. NHL Greener Rinks aims to help rink operators make similar, sustainable business decisions in their aging community rinks (average age: 30 years) while also reducing energy and operating costs.

The sustainability report also shines a welcome spotlight on RinkWatch, a research initiative launched in 2013 by two professors from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario. The program brings together citizens from across North America who share a love for outdoor hockey. Participants track and monitor backyard rinks, ponds, and winter weather conditions to assist with the study of long-term impacts of climate change. To date, more than 1,400 outdoor rinks and ponds have been tracked and monitored. Fans are encouraged to participate; those interested can visit RinkWatch.org to join the movement.

 

Creating a Sustainability Report that is accessible for fans, substantive for sustainability “deep divers”

Have you read a corporate sustainability report? I have. And let me tell you, some of them make corporate annual reports seem like light reading. And I’m a sustainability metrics nerd!

Thus, I was a bit nervous before clicking on the new NHL sustainability report. The one major criticism I had of its 2014 predecessor was that it was hard to follow as it was laid out in the “continuous scroll” format  in vogue at the time. I felt like I had to scroll forever to get to a desired topic area.

So I was immediately heartened upon seeing that the 2018 sustainability report had done away with continuous scroll and replaced it with what I call an accessible site map structure in its “Report at-a-Glance” page.

 

Report at a Glance

Screen shot of the 2018 NHL Sustainability Report’s “Report At-A-Glance” navigation page

 

Eureka! I wanted to see where climate change fit into the league’s efforts and plans. There it was, “Frozen Ponds & Climate Change,” third from the top in the Home section. Interested in how the NHL is doing in its carbon emissions reduction efforts? Check out the “Innovating the League” section, second item from the top. And so on.

“Moving away from ‘continuous scrolling’ was intentional on our part,” shared Mitchell. “Taking feedback about the readability of our 2014 report to heart, we spent a lot of time with Scrum50, our marketing agency, to develop a ‘Choose Your Adventure’ approach. This resulted in a report that is at once broad enough to engage casual fans in understanding what the NHL is doing on the environment and detailed enough for sustainability practitioners and the like to take deep, analytic dives.”

 

NHL’s First Green Month

The 2018 sustainability report comes out at the same time as the NHL is launching its first Green Month. “The last two years we had ‘Green Week’ but found out that was not enough time to do it right,” offered Mitchell. “Our clubs now have the time to activate meaningful fan engagement programs.”

 

A 30 second NHL Green Month video from the Anaheim Ducks about the environmental performance at their Honda Center arena

 

League needs to measure fan awareness of NHL Green

It says here that the one major area the NHL can improve upon in its sustainability reporting is to get a baseline measure of fan awareness of, and interest in, NHL Green and then track it over time. To my mind, this should be done ASAP — don’t wait three or four years until the next sustainability report is issued. Keeping score as to how NHL fans react to NHL Green will help the league tweak and improve upon its environmental efforts on the fly.

And when I say fans, I mean all NHL fans: those who attend games, and the far bigger number who don’t set foot in an NHL arena but who follow the sport on TV, online, via mobile devices, etc.

 

Innovate, Transform and Inspire

What will a 2022 NHL Sustainability Report look like?

It’s (way) too early to get into that conversation but, says Mitchell, the league’s direction for NHL Green is clear.

“Our sustainability missions now and going forward are to innovate, transform and inspire. Innovate means we will continue, at club and arena levels, to improve on water and electricity use, waste reductions, and more. For example, we have a goal to have installed energy efficient LED lighting at all NHL arenas within five years. Transform…an initiative like Greener Rinks is transformative. It takes what we’ve learned to help community rinks operate more effectively from a variety of environmental and efficiency perspectives. It also helps them connect on the environment with their customers. Inspire means doing more to educate and engage our fans and players to take positive environmental action. One player from each club will be designated as a Green Ambassador. ”

 

Rogers Place

Rogers Place, home of the Edmonton Oilers, features LED lighting (Photo credit: NHL)

 

The NHL also sees environmental sustainability as economic and social imperatives. Final words go to Omar Mitchell:

“Our focus on community rinks is crucial because it’s how kids come to the sport. We think Green Rinks can potentially help those rinks lower the high cost of ice time — it typically ranges between $200-$700 per hour — by reducing energy costs. Reductions in natural ice — as documented by RinkWatch — can limit kids to playing in rinks and many can’t afford it. So, you see, environmental sustainability is existential for the NHL and hockey more broadly.”

 

 

 


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GreenSportsBlogger to Moderate Panel April 3 at NYU Stern School of Business

Will you be in New York City next Tuesday evening? Interested in Green-Sports? Then come on down to NYU’s Stern School of Business at 6:30 PM ET for an engaging panel discussion on the “Intersection of Sustainability, Sports & Business,” sponsored by the Center for Sustainable Business. As a Stern alum, it will be my pleasure to moderate the event.

 

Next Tuesday evening’s panel discussion at the NYU Stern School of Business on the “Intersection of Sustainability, Sports & Business” comes at an inflection point of sorts for the Green-Sports movement.

It has been quite successful at what I call “Green-Sports 1.0,” the greening of stadia and arenas. LEED certified venues and zero-waste games are more the rule than the exception these days, and that is a very good thing.

Now, we are slowly pivoting to the early days of “Green-Sports 2.0,” in which the sports world engages fans to take positive environmental actions. For this effort to have maximum impact, teams, leagues and the media that cover them must bring environmental messaging beyond the venues. That’s because the vast majority of fans who follow sports do so not by schlepping to the ballpark or arena, but rather via TV, online, mobile, radio, and newspaper sports pages.

And, it seems to me that for version 2.0 to get where it needs to go, the sponsors and advertisers who provide much of the mother’s milk for the sports industry, will have to take a leading role.

With that in mind, I could not imagine a better panel with whom to talk about the passing of the proverbial Green-Sports baton and more:

  • Doug Behar: Senior Vice President of Operations at Yankee Stadium
  • Alicia Chin: Senior Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility, National Hockey League
  • David McKenzie: Director, Corporate Social Responsibility, Anheuser-Busch
  • Will Yandell: Northeast Regional Marketing Manager, Clif Bar & Company

The event, which takes place at Stern’s Tisch Hall (40 West 4th Street, Room 411-413), is FREE (such a deal!) but you do need to register as seating is limited. Click here to do so. Start time is 6:30. I recommend that you arrive early as it is first come, first serve and seats are not guaranteed.

 

Tisch Hall NYU

Lobby of Tisch Hall at NYU’s Stern School of Business, site of next Tuesday evening’s panel discussion on the “Intersection of Sustainability, Sports & Business” (Photo credit: Yelp)

 

Thank you to the panelists and to Stern’s Center for Sustainable Business for hosting the event. I hope to see you there! If you know someone who would be interested in attending, by all means, please forward this post.

 

 


 

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GSB News & Notes: Boston University and Eversource Partner to Save Energy at Hockey Arena; Adidas Sells One Million Shoes Made from Recycled Plastic Ocean Waste; One Man Uses Soccer to Teach Sustainability in Rural South Africa

GSB News & Notes spans the globe to bring you the constant variety of Green-Sports: Boston University’s men’s and women’s hockey teams are powerhouses. Off the ice, thanks to a partnership with utility Eversource, BU hockey is saving power at Agganis Arena. Adidas reaches a major Green-Sports milestone by selling its one millionth pair of shoes made from recycled plastic ocean waste. And a soccer-loving environmentalist in South Africa shows how one man can make a difference. 

 

COLLEGE HOCKEY POWERHOUSE BOSTON UNIVERSITY SAVES POWER IN PARTNERSHIP WITH EVERSOURCE

Boston University is a collegiate sports rarity in that neither football nor basketball are king. That honor goes to hockey as the Terriers, both men and women, are a true powerhouse. The men’s program has won five national championships and appeared in 22 Frozen Fours since 1950. The relatively young women’s program, only in its 10th year of Division I play, is still looking for its first national title but they have advanced to two Frozen Fours. And now, its home rink, the sparkling 7,200-seat Agganis Arena, is becoming a green-sports power by using significantly less of it.

And that makes BU MBA and lifelong Boston sports fan Jeff Pollock very happy.

You see, Pollock leads marketing, product management and development for Eversource, the utility company that serves the Boston area and 50 percent of Massachusetts overall, as well as 50 percent of New Hampshire and more than 70 percent of Connecticut. Developing and implementing innovative energy efficiency programs is a big priority for Eversource; marketing those programs is the responsibility of Pollock and his team.

 

Jeff Pollock_Eversource

Jeff Pollock of Eversource (Photo credit: Eversource)

 

Colleges and universities are ideal energy efficiency customers for Eversource since they are very big and high-profile energy users. BU, the largest landowner in Boston, has a major impact on local real estate. And men’s and women’s hockey is about as high profile as it gets in the BU universe.

 

Agannis Arena

Agganis Arena, home of BU men’s and women’s hockey (Photo credit: Boston University)

 

Since 2014, Eversource and BU have had a strategic agreement which takes a holistic approach to deliver the most energy savings to the university and help achieve its Climate Action Plan goals to reach zero carbon emissions by 2040. The project at Agganis Arena is an important part of that effort.

“We see athletics as a huge opportunity for carbon emissions reductions and cost savings, with lighting, heating and cooling being the prime levers,” said Pollock.

At Agganis Arena, a lighting upgrade from fluorescents to longer-lasting, efficient LED’s resulted in a 65 percent reduction in electricity usage. The quality of light improved, exceeding NCAA standards, making it easier for players and fans to see the puck. And the lighting retrofit went beyond just the bulbs. “We outfitted Agganis with a state-of-the-art lighting control system that can be managed remotely,” noted Pollack.

I think these are good first steps — steps that many greening sports venues have taken. And, though BU actively promotes its green efforts through its Sustainability@BU website and social media channels, the university, with Eversource’s support, can do more. A strong next step would be to tell its greening story directly to fans at Agganis Arena — engaging them to take similar environmental actions at home — via scoreboard messaging and other signage.

Beyond BU, Eversource has done energy efficiency work at Fenway Park and has also worked with the University of Connecticut on energy-saving improvements at Gampel Pavilion, the home of women’s and men’s basketball. In addition to an LED lighting system, the upgrade included the installation of variable-frequency drives (VFDs) to regulate air handlers and the replacement of the original chillers and cooling towers with modern equipment for more efficient heating and cooling.

 

ADIDAS REACHES A MAJOR MILESTONE: ONE MILLION SHOES SOLD MADE FROM RECYCLED PLASTIC OCEAN WASTE

In a recent appearance on CNBC, adidas CEO Kasper Rorsted — discussing where the global sportswear company decides to invest its money — when he casually mentioned that “we last year sold one million shoes made out of ocean plastic”.

The astonishing figure was achieved through its partnership with Parley for the Oceans, a nonprofit which works to reduce plastic ocean waste and, in the process, protect ocean wildlife.

It is estimated that each adidas UltraBOOST Parley sneaker reuses 11 plastic bottles. Each shoe’s “upper” (the part that goes over the top of the foot) is made from five percent recycled polyester and 95 percent waste plastic (plastic bottles, containers, etc.) dredged from the ocean around the Maldives, an archipelago that is existentially threatened by climate change off the southern coast of India. Most of the rest of the sneaker — including the heel, lining, and laces — is also made from recycled material. 

 

adidas

Adidas UltraBOOST Parley sneakers, made from 95 percent ocean waste. (Photo credit: adidas)

 

The partnership with Parley for the Oceans is a powerful example of adidas’ commitment to sustainability. “That’s where we invest money – companies that have the technology that we need, companies that have materials that are unique,” shared Mr Rorsted during the CNBC interview. “We are investing much more in [partners] that make a step forward in sustainability, or makes the manufacturing process much more sophisticated”.

 

SOCCER INSPIRES ENVIRONMENTALISM IN RURAL SOUTH AFRICA

Is it true that “one person can make a difference” on vast, global issues like conservation and pollution? A lone environmentalist in a remote part of South Africa is working to prove the truth of this adage by using sports to educate young people about sustainable practices.

Raymond Langa, living near St Lucia on the country’s east coast, was so concerned with the environmental problems in his community that he decided to take matters into his own hands.

“I am always frustrated by the environmental degradation activities taking place in areas of significance for conservation,” said Mr. Langa to the Zululand Observer. “My area has many wetlands with an abundance of wildlife, seasonal birds and waterfowl. I have identified one area which is very significant to the entire village, but households living next to it dump all types of filth into it”.

 

Raymond Langa

Raymond Langa (Photo credit: iSimangaliso.com)

 

So Mr. Langa teamed up with the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to teach local young people about the importance of sustainability and environmental protection. The park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, spanning 1,270 square miles — roughly twice the size of London — along the coast. The park is home to a stunning range of biodiversity, including coral reefs, dunes, forests and rare animals, such as the black rhino, African leopard and dolphins.

Langa’s idea was to teach young people about the importance of their spectacular neighborhood and the wildlife in it by hosting a sports event on the grounds of one of the villages bordering the southern section of the World Heritage Site.

The iSimangaliso and Dukuduku Sports Tournament, organized by Langa, featured soccer and netball — an offshoot of basketball — for school children. At the same time, workshops were hosted on conservation, environmental care and sustainable tourism.

 

Zululand Reporter

Raymond Langa and his student-athletes at the iSimangaliso and Dukuduku tournament in eastern South Africa (Photo credit: Zululand Observer)

 

In a sign that the initiative was paying immediate dividends, one participant told the Zululand Observer, “I have gained more than I was expecting to from today’s game. I learned the importance of iSimangaliso and why the youth should protect the environment”.

 

 


 

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South Pole Measures Carbon Footprint for FIFA World Cup, UEFA Euro Championships; Helps Members of Auto Racing’s FIA Offset Emissions

 

Mega-sports events like the Olympics, FIFA World Cup and Super Bowl have been greening in some way, shape or form for more than a decade. Waste reduction, LEED (or BREEAM or CASBEE) certification, measuring carbon footprint, and more. I got to thinking it would be interesting to talk to one of the companies that does the carbon footprint accounting — to understand how it works, what gets measured, what decisions, if any, are made to reduce emissions. So we were very happy to chat with Natalia Gorina and Franka Bosman of South Pole, a very interesting company that is one part sustainability consulting firm and one part emissions reduction project developer. There may be even more parts but this is good enough for now.

 

Natalia Gorina and Franka Bosman have very cool job titles and even cooler missions at South Pole.

Geneva, Switzerland-based Natalia’s is Sales Director, Carbon and Renewables. Sounds like a good fit for someone who describes her career as being “devoted to using economic incentives to solve the climate crisis.” With South Pole since 2014, Natalia helps corporations understand that it is good business to measure and reduce carbon emissions. She helps corporations talk the sustainability talk and walk the sustainability walk.

 

Natalia Gorina 1

Natalia Gorina, South Pole (Photo credit: South Pole)

 

Franka wants to “devote my life to improving the world by helping companies and people to take action against climate change.” Prior to coming to South Pole, Franka worked in finance, trying to disrupt it from the inside out.

 

Franka Bosman

Franka Bosman, South Pole (Photo credit: South Pole)

 

Natalia and Franka sure seem like they are in the right place.

 

SOUTH POLE: MATCHMAKING CARBON REDUCTION PROJECTS WITH CORPORATE FUNDERS

South Pole was founded in 2006 as a climate change fighting/sustainable business spinoff from ETH, a technical university in Switzerland. The company has since grown to over 200 employees with 16 offices around the world, with several located in Latin America, China and the Indian sub-continent where many emissions reductions projects are located.

Those employees 1) help corporate clients source and develop emissions reductions and renewable energy development projects, 2) consult on sustainability strategy for corporations and, 3) manage their own carbon emissions projects that generate carbon credits that they then try sell to corporations.

“We are more than emissions reduction credit providers,” explained Natalia. “We come in at an earlier stage than most sustainability consulting firms by investing our own funds to cover carbon certification costs and leading projects through the entire certification cycle. We serve as the project developer for renewable energy companies and local organizations that produce and distribute water filtration systems and cook stoves, for example.”

“South Pole is a matchmaker of sorts,” added Franka. “We currently have over 500 emissions projects underway that we match with corporate funders. Then we measure results in a way that is linked to the UN Sustainable Development Goals: biodiversity gains, jobs created, and more.”

 

HANDLING FAN ENGAGEMENT FOR UEFA 2016 CHAMPIONSHIP

South Pole has partnered with UEFA, the governing body of European soccer/football, since 2012. They started by calculating the greenhouse gas emissions generated from flights taken by UEFA referees and staff and offering Gold Standard certified carbon credits to offset those emissions. “We make it easy for them,” offered Natalia. “We give them a choice of projects and they choose one per year.”

Given that UEFA governs European soccer and manages Euro Championships, it makes sense that they would want to invest in European projects. Thing is, there aren’t that many to choose from because the Kyoto Protocol mandated that the lions’ share of emissions reductions projects be in the developing world. “So we have to work outside the box a bit,” advised Natalia. “Turkey, a UEFA member, has some projects. For example, last year UEFA supported the Gold Standard Cakirlar Hydro Project. And then we offer projects from countries that have a connection to a UEFA country.  For example, UEFA chose to support the Prony Windfarm project because it is located in New Caledonia, a French territory overseas. The wind turbines installed there are very innovative because they tilt downward during hurricanes which leads to significant reductions in damage.”

 

Prony Windfarm Vergnet

Prony wind farm in New Caledonia (Photo credit: Vergnet)

 

South Pole and UEFA ramped up their sustainability efforts at Euro 2016, the quadrennial continent-wide tournament by engaging fans. Fans traveling to the month-long soccer-fest held throughout France had the opportunity to offset their travel via an easy-to-use carbon calculator. “We aimed to make it fun for fans to take environmental action,” said Natalia. “Committing to measure and offset their travel entered fans into a sweepstakes; the grand prize offered a ticket to the final game.”

Fan participation levels were not as high as envisioned. Natalia attributes this to the complexity of the entry process: “Fans had to go through several steps to compensate for their emissions. It needs to be a super easy, one click process. Or, even better, have the offsetting option as the default position in the ticket purchasing process, from which fans can opt-out if they don’t want to participate.” South Pole will have the opportunity to collaborate with UEFA further on environmental issues, including hopefully improving upon fan engagement participation, with a four-year extension of its contract. That will take it through Euro 2020, the first tournament to be played across the continent rather than in one or two countries.

 

MEASURING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FOR 2018 FIFA WORLD CUPTM IN RUSSIA

FIFA, the governing body of world soccer, hired South Pole to measure greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the 2018 men’s World Cup in Russia.

The company issued a report that offered a broad estimate of GHG emissions for 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia, from the preparation phase — per Natalia: “The organizers committed to ‘green certification’ for all 12 venues; as of now, at least 3 have achieved BREEAM^ certification” — through the World Cup itself. They projected Scope 1 (direct emissions from owned or controlled sources), Scope 2 (indirect emissions from the generation of purchased energy), and Scope 3 (value/supply chain emissions). Fan travel to and from Russia, the by far the largest GHG emissions component, falls within Scope 3. According to Natalia, “More than two thirds of all GHG emissions associated with 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia are linked to international air travel of attendees.”

 

Volvograd Arena Guardian

The BREEAM-certified Volgograd Arena (Photo credit: The Guardian)

 

Not surprisingly, it says here, the organizers of the 2018 FIFA World Cup feel fan travel to get to and from Russia is not under its control and are focusing on Scopes 1 and 2. But wouldn’t emissions from travel within a country as vast as Russia be massive? Not so, said Natalia: “Emissions from travel within Russia will be much lower, in large part because the venues are concentrated in the European, west-of-the-Ural-Mountains section of the country.”

Will South Pole do an accounting of actual 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia emissions to see how they compare to the estimate? “Our assignment was just to do the estimate,” reported Natalia.

If South Pole is engaged by FIFA and the organizers of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, here’s hoping they get to report on the actual GHG emissions, and not just estimate them. Lord knows, a World Cup in Qatarian summer will be a massive environmental challenge (and that’s putting it mildly).

 

HELPING FIA MEMBERS OFFSET EMISSIONS FROM MOTOR SPORTS

Turning to motor sports, South Pole is helping members of FIA (Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile), the governing body for Formula 1, auto rallies, Formula E and more, to achieve carbon neutrality.

Similar to UEFA, South Pole is finding offset projects for FIA members to support in the areas where races take place. “Rally Australia, a long-distance auto race in Coff’s Harbour off the country’s east coast, wanted projects that benefitted wildlife and the environment in Australia,” asserted Franka. “We helped them offset unavoidable emissions by connecting them with a project that protects the habitats of the Tasmanian Devil.”

Franka also notes that, “While European projects would be desirable for sports events taking place in Europe because of their proximity, most are happy to support programs in the developing world. One, because that’s where the need is the greatest and, two, there’s a sexiness to them given the huge positive impact these projects have for local people and the environment.”

 

WHAT’S NEXT? TELLING THE STORY TO FANS MORE CONSISTENTLY

GreenSportsBlog readers certainly know that my biggest pet peeve about the sports-greening world is that the fantastic stories about its greatest advances are not being told to fans and other stakeholders with a loud enough voice. Natalia and Franka agree.

What will change this dynamic? Franka believes the impetus will come from sponsors: “Organizers of greener sports events fear that if they tout how sustainable they are, they will be criticized for what they don’t do. But their sponsors are urging them to talk about what they are doing — commitments to renewables, recycling and to offset programs that preserve at-risk species, or help people in the developing world to source clean water.”

Since sponsor dollars are almost as vital as clean water to sports teams and leagues, Franka may be on to something.

Watch this space. And keep your eyes on South Pole.

 

^ BREEAM is a British version of LEED

 


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GSB Eco-Scorecard #4: Catching Up with Green-Sports Leaders on the Field

Since 2013, GreenSportsBlog has featured the teams and athletes leading the sports-greening movement. What we haven’t focused on is their work on the field, in the arena, on the track.

So in September, we launched GSB Eco-Scoreboard: Catching Up with Green-Sports Leaders on the Field, an occasional series highlighting recent on-field/court results of the greenest teams and athletes. Why? Because if they do well, their green messages will gain a wider audience.

But what if the eco-athletes struggle?

Hey, I’m a Jets, Knicks and Rutgers sports fan. I — and a gazillion other sports fans — certainly can relate to struggle. And those engaged in the climate change fight know it is a multi-generational slog. 

So the theme of today’s fourth Eco-Scoreboard entry is struggle and overcoming obstacles.

 

STEPHEN PISCOTTY STARTS ANEW WITH OAKLAND A’S, FIGHTS ALS ON BEHALF OF MOM

GreenSportsBlog first wrote about Piscotty last January after we learned that the then-Cardinals outfielder had majored in Atmosphere and Energy Engineering at Stanford and is keenly interested in the investment and climate change fighting possibilities in inherent in renewable energy. That Piscotty was coming off of a stellar rookie campaign in 2016 made the story all the better.

But 2017 proved to be challenging on and off the field.

On the field, Piscotty dealt with two stints on the disabled list with hamstring and groin injuries along with a sophomore slump at the plate. The double whammy led to a brief demotion to Triple-A Memphis in August.

The off field news was much, much worse as Piscotty’s mother, Gretchen, was diagnosed with ALS^ or Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

In our most recent Eco-Scorecard in January, we shared the news that Piscotty had been traded by the Cardinals to the Oakland A’s, only an hour’s drive from his parents’ home. Both the Cardinals and the A’s acknowledged that Gretchen’s illness was a factor in the trade. Amazing, no?

“It says a lot about both organizations,” Piscotty said in a February 23rd interview with Martin Gallegos of The San Jose Mercury News. “Baseball is very important, but sometimes there are other things that may take priority. It’s heartwarming and humbling, and we are so grateful.”

Piscotty is projected to be the A’s starting right fielder in 2018. After a very slow start at the plate in spring training, he rebounded over the past ten days, getting his batting average up to a respectable .269 with 2 home runs. If Piscotty can stay healthy, it says here that he will provide stability and punch to the Oakland lineup, with results resembling his breakout 22 HR, 85 RBI rookie 2016 campaign rather than his difficult 2017 (9 HR, 37 RBI).

Meanwhile, the 27 year-old has decided to set up a donation page along with his family to raise funds for ALS research.

“My mom was on board with it and we felt like getting something started would be a really cool thing,” Piscotty told Gallegos. “It actually came about by one of my mom’s really good friends, who has actually been helping us a tremendous amount at the house. She is going to run a couple races and dedicate those to my mom, so we are just rallying around that to raise funding and awareness and also kind of use my platform to attack it in that sort of way. I’m pretty excited about the support we have gotten already, and we’ll keep going.”

 

 

Piscotty A's

Stephen Piscotty in his new Oakland A’s uniform (Photo credit: Aric Crabb/Bay Area News Group)

 

 

More Piscotty: “It’s one of those things that is hard to talk about, but awareness is step one and then the funding. People have to know about it before they are going to donate, and what have you. I think that is the biggest thing. The ice bucket challenge that happened a few years ago was a tremendous thing, and I think there is a jalapeno challenge that is starting to circle around, and hopefully that catches fire too. Things like that day by day and little by little will eventually get us there.”

People looking to contribute to the fund can do so by visiting www.youcaring.com/alstherapydevelopmentinstitute-1101042#mlb-oakland.

 

POW MEMBER AND U.S. CROSS COUNTRY SKIER ANDY NEWELL HOPES PYEONGCHANG 2018 IS HIS LAST OLYMPICS

Cross country skier Andy Newell is a leading member of Protect Our Winters (POW), the group of elite winter sports athletes who advocate for climate action. In the run up to the 2014 Sochi Olympics, Newell co-drafted a letter with fellow Vermonter and climate change fighter Bill McKibben — and founder of 350.org — addressed to world leaders, urging them to sign the Paris Climate Agreement. He helped lead POW’s participation in the People’s Climate March in New York City last April and has lobbied members of Congress of both parties on climate-related legislation.

Qualifying for his fourth Olympics at age 34, Newell took on the high-pressured first leg of the 4×10 km relay. After a decent start — he reached the initial 1.67 km split in 8th place in the 14-team race — Newell struggled, ending up in 12th place with a time of 26 minutes 09.7 seconds, 1.28.8 off the lead. Team USA’s difficulties continued from there as they finished in last, 9 minutes 24 seconds behind the gold medal winners from Norway.

“As expected, it was tough,” Newell told USA Today Network’s Jeff Seidel. “It’s always nerve-wracking to go out first. It’s an honor to lead off the team, but it’s also a high-pressure situation. I went out and did my best. I was dying. I actually barfed my face off at the end of the race. That’s how I know I pushed myself pretty hard.”

 

Andy Newell

Andy Newell (r) and Canada’s Len Valjas scrambling during the first leg 4×10 km cross country ski race at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics (Photo credit: Flying Point Road)

 

Newell hopes PyeongChang is his final Olympics, despite sounding like he wants to give qualifying for Beijing 2022 a go.

Wait, what? He wants to try out for another Olympics and…fail?

Well, when one considers Newell’s team-first, legacy-based ethos, his willingness to see the next generation of U.S cross country skiers beat him out four years from now starts to make some sense.

“The only thing that would make me happier than going to a…fifth Olympics would be that the U.S. team is so strong that a guy like me can’t make it,” said Newell to Seidel.“Hopefully those guys will be crushing it and they will be coming in as medal contenders…I hope that an old guy like me won’t even be able to make the team four years from now.”

 

FOREST GREEN ROVERS STRUGGLING TO AVOID RELEGATION

GreenSportsBlog readers know Forest Green Rovers (FGR) as the Greenest Team in Sports — from its solar powered “Mow-Bots” used to manicure the organic pitch at The New Lawn stadium to all vegan-only concession stands.

FGR took a major step up on the pitch in 2017, earning promotion from the fifth to the fourth tier of English football — the highest rung achieved in the club’s 125-year history. The trick for FGR this season is to stay in the fourth tier and avoid relegation down from whence they came. Their task is clear: finish above the bottom two places in the 24-team league when the campaign ends in May.

Newly-promoted sides often struggle to stay “up” and FGR is no different as they’ve flirted with the “drop zone” all season. But an undefeated February (three wins and a draw) gave the club some breathing room.

Their run of good play continued as the calendar turned to March when super-sub Lee Collins scored in the 81st minute to earn a back-and-forth 3-3 draw at Newport County.

 

Lee Colins

Forest Green Rovers’ Lee Collins (#5) exults after scoring the 81st minute equalizer in their 3-3 draw at Newport County on March 3rd (Photo credit: Forest Green Rovers)

 

The 81st minute came back to bite FGR at home on Saturday as it was Notts County who scored during that 60 second window to earn a 2-1 win, ending Forest Green’s six match unbeaten streak. Still, the club sits in 20th place with 37 points, seven points ahead of the drop zone with 10 matches to play.

But safety is not yet assured as the season moves to its May conclusion and the struggle continues for FGR with two road contests in four days.

First, Forest Green visits first place Accrington Stanley on Saturday. Then its a mid-week battle among two clubs eager to stay afloat when FGR heads to 19th place Crewe Alexander.

 


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San Diego Padres and Sullivan Solar Partner on Biggest Solar Installation in MLB at Petco Park

On-site solar at sports stadia and arenas has become a “thing” over the past decade across all sports. Starting with the Colorado Rockies and Coors Field in 2007, Major League Baseball has seen its share solar-topped roofs and solar canopied parking lots pop up. Most of the MLB installations have been on the smallish side. That changes with the late March opening of the largest solar installation in the big leagues at Petco Park, a partnership between the San Diego Padres and Sullivan Solar Power.

 

The San Diego Padres are poised to flip the switch this month on the largest solar installation in Major League Baseball at Petco Park. In fact, the 336,500 kW system will generate more electricity than all of the solar systems in MLB combined. It is thus fitting that the groundbreaking Petco Park solar system is being built and installed by Sullivan Solar Power, one of the most innovative and inspiring solar companies in Southern California if not the entire country.

The inspiring part of the Sullivan Solar Power story comes from the company’s namesake and founder, Daniel Sullivan.

A lifelong San Diegan, Sullivan was a 27 year-old electrician in 2004. Concerned about what he saw as a war-for-oil in Iraq, especially with the perspective that comes with being a new dad, and sensing an opportunity with a clean, domestic form of energy, Sullivan went to his boss and suggested the company get involved with solar. The boss said no at first and then, perhaps tired of his persistent employee’s repeated requests, finally relented — to a point — by saying, “if you want to build it yourself, go ahead. But we aren’t changing our focus to doing solar.”

Sullivan said something to the effect of “to heck with that” and founded his own company, Sullivan Solar Power.

 

 

 

Daniel Sullivan

Daniel Sullivan, founder of Sullivan Solar Power (Photo credit: Sullivan Solar Power)

 

Problem was, he had only $2,500 in the bank, a pickup truck and some tools.

So Sullivan started by living and working out of the garage of one of his first customers. Fast-forward a couple of years and things had improved somewhat: Sullivan Solar Power had four employees had leased office space. And Sullivan was no longer living at the garage. Instead, he was living at the office — hiding that fact from his colleagues — and showering at the gym.

But, the company’s mission — to fundamentally change the way we make electricity — along with its commitment to quality work, its educate-the-customer-about-solar ethos, its robust lineup of community service engagements, and its use of American-made panels began to resonate in Greater San Diego. So, too did Sullivan’s money back guarantee to customers. According to Tara Kelly, Sullivan Solar Power’s director of community development, “When Daniel started this company 14 years ago, there were less than 100 solar power systems on our local grid and it was much more expensive to go solar. Daniel, an electrician by trade, was so confident that his systems would pay off for customers; he offered to pay them if the panels didn’t produce as promised. The result? About 50 percent of our customers come from referrals.”

 

Tara Kelly Sullivan Solar Power

Tara Kelly, Sullivan Solar Power’s Director of Community Development (Photo credit: Sullivan Solar Power)

 

Those referrals have helped Sullivan Solar Power grow to over 100 employees in offices that serve San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Orange Counties. It is on several fastest-growing companies lists, from the global (Inc. Magazine 5000) to the local (San Diego Business Journal 100). They were the fourth company in the U.S. to earn accreditation from the prestigious North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP).

Sullivan Solar Power’s business, in terms of installed capacity, is about a 25-75 split between residential and commercial customers, depending on the year. Local universities, from San Diego State — Tara Kelly’s alma mater — to the University of San Diego to UC San Diego to UC Irvine are among the company’s largest customers. Petco Park is the company’s first stadium project.

“The Padres put out a RFP for the project and we responded,” Kelly recalled. “It was a lengthy process but ended up winning the bid last summer. Work began on the installation, which sits atop Petco Park’s overhanging awning, in December.”

 

Petco Park Solar Photo 3

A crane lowers equipment for Sullivan Solar Power’s installation of its solar system atop Petco Park, home of the San Diego Padres (Photo credit: Sullivan Solar Power)

 

The solar power system, which will have nearly three times as much capacity as AT&T Park in San Francisco’s 120 kW — good enough for second biggest in MLB —  is just about complete. It will utilize high-efficiency, 470-watt Sunpower solar modules. The Padres are slated to avoid over $4 million in San Diego Gas & Electric costs over the next 25 years from this solar project. The plan is to turn it on in time for solar-generated electrons to flow at the Padres’ home opener March 29th vs. the Milwaukee Brewers.

 

Petco Park Solar Photo 7

The Sullivan Solar Power team installs part of what will become the largest solar array in Major League Baseball at Petco Park (Photo credit: Sullivan Solar Power)

 

Petco Park Solar Photo 6

The Sullivan Solar Power installation team takes a break during the installation of its solar system at Petco Park earlier this year (Photo credit: Sullivan Solar Power)…

 

Rock Center

…evoking the iconic photo of the Rockefeller Center construction crew taking a lunch break above the New York City skyline in 1932 (Photo credit: Bettman Collection/Corbis)

 

Sullivan Solar Power is partnering with the team to publicize the solar system and the value of renewable energy to Padres fans. “We have signage at Petco Park and will be showing photos or videos of the solar project to let fans know they’re in a solar-powered stadium,” said Kelly. “And, this year we will collaborate with the Padres for the second annual Solar Day at Petco Park, offering educational seminars on how solar can make a positive difference for fans at their residences as well.”

Educating baseball fans on the benefits of solar is just another evocation of Daniel Sullivan’s mission to fundamentally change the way make electricity. It goes back to his original inspirations — a safe, clean environment for his son, one that is free from wars-for-oil as well as from subsidies that favor fossil fuel development.

On this last point, Petco Park is not the only high profile venue at which Sullivan will educate the public. In 2016 and 2017, he bought full page ads in the San Diego Union-TribuneSullivan used that space to write long-form articles about the costs, locally and more broadly, of fossil fuel subsidies and oil wars. Click here and here to read two of them.

Sullivan’s is an important voice in support of the environmental, climate change-fighting and economic (i.e. green jobs) benefits of solar power. Here’s hoping the Petco Park installation is the first of many sports venues at which Sullivan Solar Power can share its vitally important mission with fans.

 


 

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Green-Sports Startups, Part 4: Derek Battle and Play Fresh — Teaching Climate Change and Football

Well-known global corporations, from BASF to Miller-Coors to Nike, have waded into the Green-Sports waters. While it makes sense for them to do so from PR and mission points of view, Green-Sports, for now, represents a small aspect of these companies’ businesses.

Then again, there are startups for which Green-Sports is a significant part of their raison d’être. Last year, GreenSportsBlog launched an occasional series, Green Sports Startups that focuses on small (for now) companies and nonprofits that see the greening of sports as existential to their prospects for success. Our first three startups are Nube 9, a Seattle-based company committed to making recyclable sports uniforms in the U.S.A from American fabrics, Underdogs United, which helps sports teams already talking the green talk to walk the green walk by selling them renewable energy credits generated by vital greening projects in the developing world, and Phononic, a tech company that sees sports venues as important testing grounds for its audacious ambition to disrupt the set-in-its-ways refrigeration market, leading to a meaningful reduction in carbon emissions.

Today we talk with Derek Battle, founder of Play Fresh, a nonprofit that uses American football as a catalyst to help build environmental awareness among at-risk kids and teens. The goal is to give them the tools necessary to combat environmental risks and their adverse effects on their communities. 

 

 

GreenSportsBlog: Creating Play Fresh as a nonprofit that aims to use football as a medium to teach kids about the challenges and opportunities presented by climate change is a novel approach to be sure.  To understand how you came up with it, much less turn it from idea to reality has to be a fascinating story that, I imagine, starts with the football side of the equation. Am I right?

Derek Battle: Yes you are! I grew up playing football through high school in Charlotte, then played linebacker at the University of Delaware, Class of 2015…

GSB: …The Fighting Blue Hens!

DB: Exactly! I played as a freshman but tore my anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), rehabbed, made it back to the team, started again, but then I tore my other ACL. And so that was it, football-wise, at least at that level.

 

 

Play Fresh Group Pic

Play Fresh co-founder Derek Battle (2nd from right) and the management team. From left to right: Marketing strategist Will Prstowsky, Co-founder Keon Williams, Battle, and COO Ena Linton (Photo credit: Play Fresh)

 

GSB: A brutal yet all-too-familiar story. So where and when did your interest in climate change come about?

DB: I always had a passion for science and majored in Energy and Environmental Policy. While at Delaware I met John Byrne of the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy. He suggested I check it out, that this was where the future was heading and that there would be strong employment opportunities. So I did, found it interesting and that started me on the climate road.

GSB: So where did the connection between football and climate come from?

DB: As I was learning about climate change, I thought there could be a strong correlation between sports, environmental sustainability and the climate change fight.

GSB: AMEN!

DB: I did my senior thesis research on stadiums and energy efficiency. And I got an internship with the Philadelphia Water Department

GSB: What did that entail?

DB: It was really cool — I worked on the first sewage geothermal solution in Pennsylvania. We investigated it for big public buildings, like Lincoln Financial Field, home of the Super Bowl Champion Eagles, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art…

GSB: Of “Rocky” fame…

DB: That’s the one.

GSB: Did those buildings end up implementing the sewage geothermal solution?

DB: Unfortunately, no. But it really inspired me. So then I did research for the Environmental Center on solar, wind and sewage geothermal on NFL stadiums, focusing primarily on M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, home of the Ravens.

GSB: What did you find out?

DB: That it paid off from a financial point of view. Again, the club didn’t implement it but it further cemented the idea that I wanted to work in the green-sports niche. That said, there weren’t opportunities in that niche when I graduated so I took a job in the insurance industry, focused primarily on construction safety. The key thing for me was that the job afforded flexibility in terms of hours and working from home. Which meant I could pursue green-sports. I went to the Green Sports Alliance Summits in 2015 and 2016 in Chicago and Houston. And I took online courses through the University of Seattle’s Sports, Sustainability & Leadership program in 2016-2017. Courses included policy, marketing and fan engagement.

GSB: Did Play Fresh emerge during this time period?

DB: Yes…In around December 2016, as I was learning a ton about sustainability and sports, I thought, “I know a lot about football already. Why not host an eco-friendly football camp where we could teach inner city youth about climate change?” I talked to some of my friends who’d played in the NFL — they gave me some encouragement. And then I reconnected with a high school friend, Keon Williams, who played cornerback at Gardner-Webb University in South Carolina. And he wanted to host a camp. But he wasn’t eco-minded, at least not to that point.

GSB: Did he become green-minded?

DB: Definitely. We became partners and I took some grant writing and policy courses through University of Seattle, which furthered my knowledge base for starting up a nonprofit. By that time I had moved to Baltimore, started networking, connected with a fellow named Joe Gamble who was running an NFL-endorsed “Play 60” program and coached youth football. Joel’s program along with a great guy Jeff Thompsons, and members from the Baltimore Office of Sustainability really helped me learn the social dynamics of the city so that my project would be accepted by the youth. We applied for 501-C3 status and produced a business plan, thanks to my girlfriend, Ena Linton, who is getting her Masters in Public Health at George Washington University — she sees Play Fresh as a public health initiative.

GSB: Then what happened?

DB: Spring 2017 was devoted to organizing the event. We modeled it on Council for Responsible Sport certification standards. Unfortunately, getting certified was too expensive for us just starting out, but we were still committed to developing sustainable operations. We connected with companies who were just as committed to reducing their environmental impact such as, Eco-Promotions. They supplied us with BPA-free water bottles, plus they planted a tree to offset the production of each bottle. Staff and participant t-shirts were made from recycled material and the screen printing was done with eco-friendly dyes by a local company, Momentum Printing.

GSB: That’s impressive. So when did you have the camp and how did it go?

DB: The camp took place on July 22 in Patterson Park in Baltimore City. We had 62 kids from 12 to 16 years of age and 20 coaches, including three with NFL experience. On the football side, we did all sorts of testing — 40-yard dash, shuttle run, etc. — and worked with them on how to improve their performance since college recruiters put a lot of stock on those results. And we held a variety of 7-on-7 scrimmages. On the sustainability side, we handled it in stealthy way in some respects.

 

Play Fresh 40 yd dash

Play Fresh athletes run the 40 yard dash (Photo credit: Play Fresh)

 

Play Fresh 3D Group

Younger Play Fresh athletes engage in flag football drills (Photo credit: Play Fresh)

 

GSB: How so?

DB: We provided healthy food and snacks and the water bottles. Kids who walked, biked and bused were entered into raffle to win Beats headphones. Throughout the day, we put the onus on the kids to improve their circumstances and their local environment, whether it be through recycling, using a reusable water bottle or participating in community clean-ups. The general messaging was that Under Armour inspires you all to “Protect This House” but at Play Fresh we want to Protect This WORLD!

 

Play Fresh Fresh Change

Play Fresh attendees engage in environmental cleanup in Baltimore City (Photo credit: Play Fresh)

 

Play Fresh H2O bottles Kristin Hanczor

Sustainability Officer Kristin Hanczor provides Play Fresh athletes with reusable BPA-Free water bottles (Photo credit: Play Fresh)

 

GSB: I love that! Did your team talk to the kids about climate change?

DB: We felt that, as mentioned earlier, that a softer approach was the way to go. Climate change would not have resonated with these kids at that time. But getting them to be aware of and take care of their built environment, we hope, will allow them to be open to climate change going forward.

GSB: How much did it cost?

DB: With the sponsorship from Spornado, and some friends and family funding and not looking for a margin, we were able to drive the cost down to $20 but even that was too expensive for many kids.

GSB: That’s a sad reality…

DB: No doubt and we really can’t do it at that price again. But we are going forward this summer with two Play Fresh events. Our camps will be on June 16 in Charlotte — we’re looking for 100 kids at $30 each and then we’ll be back in Baltimore City in July — date is still TBD — again, going for 100 kids at $30 each. We’re hoping to get grants from Under Armour…

GSB: …A great local Baltimore company.

DB: Under Armour, Nike and/or adidas to help take us to the next level.

GSB: That was going to be my final question. How do you plan to scale Play Fresh?

DB: Our goals are to be like a “Nike Combine” on the football side and ramp up the eco-messaging. So, we will need to have a strong 2018 as a proof point for funders and then ramp up in 2019 with more events and markets. At the same time, we’re building out our ongoing and new Play Fresh initiatives. We have a partnership with Chip’n in which any athlete who volunteers six hours at a local event or organization will receive a complimentary pass to the Play Fresh camp. Through Chip’n’s mobile app, athletes can find local volunteer opportunities and our complimentary ticket offer. And we’ve got Play Fresh 3-D where children participate in a series of relays that test their knowledge of which everyday materials are compostable, recyclable and non-recyclable, as well as, educating them on how air pollution reduces community wellness. Additionally, with our Fresh Change initiative, we work to engage student athletes in community cleanups throughout school year. Really, what we’re looking to create is a living classroom for kids of all ages.

 

Play Fresh Chip'N

 


 

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