The GSB Interview: Lex Chalat, On Where Green-Sports Fits with Beyond Sport and thinkBeyond

Green-Sports is one spoke of the Purpose & Sports wheel that also includes child protection, diversity and inclusion, supporting refugees and more. Lex Chalat began working in that space in 2008 when she joined Beyond Sport, which was just starting out in London, and she hasn’t left.

Since then, she helped the organization become an influential convener and funder of sport-for-good nonprofits around the world. And Lex also has been a driving force behind thinkBeyond — a consultancy born out of Beyond Sport — that “helps organizations and people that do good, to do it better through sports.”

Our conversation covered a wide range of topics, including where the environment fits in the Beyond Sport/thinkBeyond “cause lineup” and how green can become a bigger factor going forward.

 

GreenSportsBlog: Lex, I’ve wanted to interview you for GreenSportsBlog for a long time so thank you! I can sometimes get very myopic about Green-Sports and so having the perspective of someone who looks at all aspects of Purpose & Sport, from gender to refugees to, well, green, is valuable indeed. How did you get into the sport-for-good niche?

Lex Chalat: I was a gymnast growing up in Colorado, so I got the power of sports early on. Went to UPenn in Philadelphia and became captain of the gymnastics team, which was just an incredible experience that has had a lasting influence on my life. Majored in journalism and art history. After graduation, I became a journalist in Philly, working at a small local paper in the southwest section of the city. It was really a forgotten neighborhood of Philadelphia, not well connected to mass transit. The problems were many and serious but there also was a lot of good going on in the Southwest. We only wrote good news stories about the community — which meant most of them focused on arts, music and sports — hey, if you wanted to read about murders in the area, then you’d read The Inquirer! From there I moved to being editor at South Philly Review, which covered similar topics. I also wrote about community development and art for Philadelphia Weekly, including a weekly column called The Edge that told stories about how arts and sports were both gentrifying but also supporting the development of the areas on the fringes of the city. I loved and became obsessed with not only the writing but also community development.

 

Beyond Innovation Summit

Lex Chalat (Photo credit: Beyond Sport)

 

GSB: Did you go into community development?

Lex: No. Instead I got my Masters at the London School of Economics, choosing that school because of its independent, open-ended approach. So I created my own path, studying about unique catalysts for change — like sports and arts — in urban areas. In fact, my dissertation was entitled, “Art Affects.”

GSB: Very cool. What did you do next?

Lex: So in 2008, I saw that an entrepreneur and ex-athlete, Nick Keller, was starting something called Beyond Sport. He had some very prominent early backers, with Tony Blair being the chairman of the Beyond Sport Ambassadors…

GSB: You can’t get more prominent in Great Britain than Tony Blair! He had just left the Prime Ministership at that time, right?

Lex: That’s right. He and Nick both saw the power of the connection between sport, the business world, and society. Not a lot of people were talking about it then, especially not in the private sector.

GSB: Having Tony Blair onboard was a huge coup!

Lex: Yes! He helped Beyond Sport get support from other elite athletes and celebrities of that time like David Beckham, Seb Coe…

GSB: Former world record holder of the mile and the head of the London 2012 Olympics…

Lex: …former NBA basketball star and U.S. Senator Bill Bradley, legendary Olympic swimmer Donna De Varona and more.

GSB: That’s an impressive roster

Lex: I saw that Beyond Sport launched and said to myself, ‘Obviously I’m going to work for them.’ I found out they were looking for an intern and even though I had a Masters degree, I said ‘YES!’ right away. We were a true startup — there were eight of us at the time. Our approach was to connect governments and the private sector to help publicize and fund the most effective nonprofits in the burgeoning “sport for good” world. And we had early success, thanks in large part to signing Barclays as a lead sponsor. By the summer of 2009, we were hosting the first Beyond Sport global summit in London. Desmond Tutu, Australian Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer Ian Thorpe, and Marcus Agius, the CEO of Barclays at the time, headlined the speaker list. Sport-for-good organizations applied for Beyond Sport awards, which included a prize of funding and business support, in categories like Sport for Education, Sport for Health, and the Environment. We covered the cost of all short-listed organizations to get to London for the Summit. It was INCREDIBLE!!!

 

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Adolf Ogi, UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace and former President of the Swiss Confederation, presents the 2009 Beyond Sport Humanitarian in Sport to Archbishop Desmond Tutu (Photo credit: Beyond Sport)

 

GSB: No kidding! So convening the private sector and governments to fund sport-for-good became Beyond Sport’s ‘special sauce’?

Lex: That’s right…And the Summits allowed us to educate, tell stories, and inspire. Since those early days, we’ve diversified and grown, with Beyond Sport United, which brings the major U.S. leagues together to explore how they can make a bigger social impact, Beyond Innovation — focused on Sport-for-STEM, Beyond Soccer, Beyond Rugby, Beyond Sport UK, Beyond Sport Mexico… the list goes on.

GSB: I’ve been to one global Summit and several Beyond Sport United events, although none in the last couple years. And, full disclosure, I was a judge for the environmental category shortlist a few years back. The events I attended were indeed inspiring — seeing the incredible Sport-for-Good nonprofits, like Skateistan, an organization that teaches kids in war torn Kabul, Afghanistan to skateboard, was, well…beyond. What’s been happening with Beyond Sport since 2015-2016?

 

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Kids participate in 2013 ‘Sport For Education’ Beyond Sport Global Award winner Skateistan’s program in Kabul, Afghanistan (Photo credit: Skateistan)

 

Lex: A lot has changed since we first started. First, the sport for good world has become far more sophisticated. Second, the corporate and government sectors are far more interested and committed to purpose than they were a decade ago. And finally, we have found people are interested in engaging in content in a different way. As a result of these three key components, we are constantly trying to revolutionize how we evolve and deliver our platforms so we can continue to benefit the sectors, but also push forward and grow. This year, we’re really changing it up with Beyond Sport United this September.

GSB: How so?

Lex: For the past few years, Beyond Sport United has expanded beyond a one-day conference to include peripheral events – from Community in Action to roundtable, senior leadership discussions. This year, we are creating something called Beyond Sport House, which will be one location that will host many small, vibrant sessions. Along with Beyond Sport United, which will still focus on teams and leagues, there will be pop-up talks here, workshops there, debates across the hall, networking in a corner over there. The discussions will be solutions-oriented, no matter the topic, from human rights to mental health to STEM to the environment. The content will be partner-led and attendees will be able to curate their own itinerary, as well as run their own sessions and side meetings. There will also be a chance to attend affiliate UN week events after Beyond Sport House closes. It will be a very fluid way of serving content and a different way to engage people. Details will be coming out soon.

GSB: WOW! It sounds like you and your team have gone beyond shaking things up! Does this mean the Beyond Sport Awards are no longer?

Lex: Not at all! That’s one of the most exciting things we’re working on this year. The awards will still play a major role, although we are re-envisioning them. There will still be a number of categories, a short list for each and then a winner. What’s new is that we are looking to add two big awards to deal with two big UN Global Goals. One is likely to be gender or social-related and — you will like this — the other is likely to be climate action. We’re looking to get bigger funding and name multiple “sport for good” organizations — likely three to five — as winners of each prize. They will be tasked with teaming up to come up with big solutions to the defined mega-problem.

GSB: So it’s a matter of the whole being great than the sum of its parts?

Lex: Exactly. We’re really excited about this.

GSB: I can see why. I’m looking forward to attending. Now, let’s pivot to thinkBeyond. What is it, how did it come about and how does it relate to Beyond Sport?

Lex: This goes back to 2013. Barclays announced they were ending their partnership but they gave us a three-year off-ramp, which was very generous of them. So we had some time to think about how to diversify our revenue generation because, since the Great Recession of 2008, the corporate sponsorship world was changing dramatically. Getting corporates to sponsor conferences and summits like ours became exponentially harder. On the other hand, many corporations were becoming increasingly interested in ‘purpose’engaging their communities and stakeholders for good, enhancing their brands, attracting and retaining employees — but didn’t know how to do it! Through Beyond Sport, we had the expertise about how to use sport to develop and execute purpose-driven strategies. And we sat at the intersection of hundreds of governing bodies, incredible sport-for-good nonprofits — most of which many brands had never heard of — and government agencies that could help activate those strategies. thinkBeyond grew out of this, really taking off in 2014-15.

GSB: So thinkBeyond is a purpose-driven strategic agency that uses the deep experience developed through Beyond Sport. With whom have you worked and what kind of work have you done?

Lex: We work in three main buckets — 1. Helping corporations and sports governing bodies develop their ‘sport for good’ strategies; 2. Implementing and activating those strategies; and 3. Helpng to position and communicate those strategies. ESPN is a great example of our work in all arenas. thinkBeyond developed and project manages their international purpose-driven initiative, “Built To Play,” in Latin America, India and Australia. It creates safe spaces to play as well as providing access to sport for women, employment training programs and more. Key to the program’s success was our ability to find the nonprofits on the ground in the local areas that made things happen. We also work with SAP on their sport and CSR strategy. The NFL and NHL are also clients we work with on developing purpose-driven content. So is the Qatar FIFA 2022 World Cup as well as World Rugby.

In January we launched thinkBeyond Talent — we advise athletes on how to make the most of their purpose-driven efforts.

GSB: Who have you signed on so far?

Lex: We manage Olympic sprinter Michael Johnson’s foundation, work with Brian Dawkins of the Philadelphia Eagles, helping him develop his new foundation, and Kate and Helen Richardson-Walsh, British Olympic field hockey players and the first gay married couple on Team GB, developing their cause narrative.

GSB: Great work on two counts: 1. Coming up with a smart, sustainable response to the need for Beyond Sport to change its business model, and 2. Developing impactful thinkBeyond programs that benefit people on the ground and sponsor brands. Now let’s talk environment and climate. It’s always seemed to me that green has taken a bit of a back seat to the other areas of endeavor at Beyond Sport. What’s your take?

Lex: To be totally honest, Beyond Sport has struggled in the green space. We’ve never gotten huge interest from our nonprofit and corporate networks on environment and climate. It’s been on the periphery. Since we’re not “Sport for Climate” experts, judging Beyond Sport’s environmental awards and creating our green content have largely been outsourced to the Green Sports Alliance and other leaders. thinkBeyond changed all that, finding corporate clients interested in green, in climate. We helped BT in 2015-16 with their 100% Sport initiative in the UK that got athletes and teams to push for action on climate. We handled their online campaign and managed their activation at the COP21 climate conference in Paris…

GSB: …The conference where Paris Climate Accord was signed.

Lex: We’re also working with Lewis Pugh, the long-distance swimmer, to get corporate partnerships through thinkBeyond Talent. He swims in places like Antarctica to highlight the seriousness of climate change.

GSB: Pugh is an incredible eco-athlete and humanitarian…

 

Lewis Pugh

Lewis Pugh trains for his 2018 across the English Channel which helped spur the UK government to take action to protect the world’s oceans (Photo credit: Kelvin Trautman)

 

Lex: Absolutely. We’ve done better, green-wise, with thinkBeyond which I think is a sign that people care about it they just don’t know how to activate that interest. But we’re not where we want to be yet. And we’re ramping up, green-wise, on Beyond Sport. In fact, there will be a Global Goals workshop focused on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at Beyond Sport House in New York in September. So green will be featured — along with gender equity, refugees, safe play and more.

GSB: What can Beyond Sport, thinkBeyond, the Green Sports Alliance, the UN, and others do to accelerate sport’s involvement with the climate crisis? Because, per the UNFCC’s latest report, the world doesn’t have time to waste. And I ask this question knowing there are politics involved.

Lex: I think Beyond Sport can ensure there is always a platform for experts to share how they are tackling climate issues through sport; thinkBeyond can do its part by tooling up our strategic services to cater to those who want to develop sustainability strategies – so we can make sure we help them in a smart way; and I think GSA and other experts need to move forward, and go beyond sport (no pun intended) by that I mean: In addition to trying to fix the sports world, we need to work with sports to fix the world. And, as far as climate change is concerned, we need to go beyond greening the sports world, and find ways for sports to green the world.

 

 

 

 


 

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The GSB Interview: Mike Dohnert, Helping to Green Citi Field

For someone who remembers attending his first big league ballgame¹ at Shea Stadium, the then two-year-old home of the New York Mets in 1966, it is hard to believe that its successor, Citi Field, will celebrate its tenth birthday in April.

Built on what was Shea’s parking lot, Citi Field was at the leading edge of green venues when it opened in 2009. Given the advances in stadium greening in the intervening decade, we decided to see how the ballpark and the Mets have kept up. To do so, we went out to Queens to meet with Mike Dohnert, the Mets longtime director of operations.

 

GreenSportsBlog: Mike, you’ve been at Citi Field since the doors opened almost ten years ago. That means you’re the best person to talk about the stadium’s green history and where things can go from here. How did you come to work with the Mets in what sounds like such a cool job?

Mike Dohnert: Well, Lew, I grew up as a huge Mets fan in lower Manhattan…

GSB: …As a lifelong Yankees fan, you have my sympathies…

Mike: …Let’s Go Mets! I went to the State University of New York (SUNY) Geneseo and then transferred to Baruch College in Manhattan. I studied operations management, graduating in 2001. In 1999, I got an internship with the Mets at Shea Stadium, working for the manager of ballpark operations at the time.

GSB: That sounds like a cool internship…

 

Mike Dohnert Mets

Mike Dohnert, director of operations of the New York Mets, at Citi Field (Photo credit: New York Mets)

 

Mike: Oh yeah! I mean it was sports, it was the Mets, it was great. When the internship ended, my boss, Sue Lucchi, said she needed help. I said “sure.” And I’ve been there ever since.

GSB: What did you do during the internship?

Mike: Anything to do with the playing field and the club offices. Shea was owned by the City of New York; the city was responsible for the structure itself; the electrical, plumbing, etc. So we really weren’t involved in things like energy efficiency. That would change once Citi Field opened in 2009.

GSB: I know that sustainability was embedded in the DNA of Citi Field’s construction. Were you involved?

Mike: Not in the construction phase — I’m strictly an operations guy. Interestingly, the one thing we were responsible for was the maintenance of a 14 foot fire lane between Shea Stadium and Citi Field. The new stadium was built in Shea’s parking lot and the two ballparks were very, very close together.

 

Citi Shea.png

Aerial photo of Shea Stadium in the foreground and the then under-construction Citi Field across a narrow path in the rear (Photo credit: Mark Lennihan/AP)

 

GSB: I can imagine. What were some of the greener aspects of Citi Field when it opened?

Mike: The HVAC system was quite advanced for that time. Since then we’ve added a building management system (BMS) with sensors to collect energy usage data in real time. The front office was upgraded to LEDs over the last two years — we didn’t go with LEDs at the opening since they were so expensive back ten years ago. Since then, the price has of course come down precipitously so we’re doing rolling upgrades, starting in 2017-18 with the front office and plaza level. And this is just the beginning because we know that, by 2025, we need to be in compliance with Local Law 88

GSB: …the New York City law governing energy efficiency.

Mike: We have an engineering firm looking how to help us get there on lighting with LEDs for the field, concourses, bathrooms and everything else. Sensors as well.

GSB: How is Citi Field doing on water efficiency?

Mike: We’ve got waterless urinals and low-flow toilets. Xlerator hand dryers are big energy savers, from a kilowatt hours (kWh) perspective, as well as from saving on paper towels and reduced maintenance. The club looked into a gray water-water retention program a couple years ago but city regulations prevented it. We are looking at sub-metering water usage which would highlight savings opportunities.

GSB: And perhaps those city regulations will change in the not-too-distant future. What about the green roof?

Mike: The 11,000 square foot green roof is atop the administration offices in right field. It’s naturally irrigated and uses hydroponics. We grow fruits and vegetables up there. It provides natural insulation, cooling the indoor spaces below in summer. It also helps regulate water runoff.

GSB: That’s great. Can fans see it?

Mike: There is a partial view for some fans on the promenade level and so some of fans do get a view.

GSB: One thing all fans can see is a comprehensive recycling and composting presence. Where do things stand at Citi Field?

Mike: Recycling and composting are challenging in New York City. We switched our recycling hauler about a year ago to RTS to help us be more aggressive in combating the challenges. Composting is expensive and there aren’t many places to take it. Right now we compost in the back-of-house only…

 

Mets RTS Recycle Trash

RTS recycling bins on the lower right field concourse at Citi Field (Photo credit: New York Mets)

 

GSB: …Meaning you compost organic material in the kitchens but the fans, or front-of-house, don’t have a composting option yet.

Mike: That’s right. Now, with back-of-house plus recycling, we divert about 40 percent of our waste from landfill. The good thing is that along with RTS and Aramark, our concessionaire, we are going to devise a comprehensive recycling-composting plan in the next few months so we can open up front-of-house. Doing so should get us to 80-85 percent diversion. And we’ll be going front-of-house at the same time as we continue to increase our veggie and fruit choices, much of it locally grown.

GSB: Good to hear. Now I notice that there are no solar panels here. Have you looked into it?

Mike: We’ve discussed it for several years. The problem for us is that our roof really isn’t that big. So solar-powered carports might be the more practical play. But there are complexities there, too. As you could tell when you walked to the office, across the street from our outfield wall is a string of auto body shops.

GSB: I’m well familiar with the “chop shops.”

Mike: Well, they’re not long for this world. The area is undergoing a redevelopment and there could be an impact on our parking lots during construction. So it’s difficult for us to invest in solar-topped carports, or anything else for that matter, in the parking area, at least in the short term.

GSB: So it ain’t easy, especially in the short term. Longer term, how committed to sustainability and the environment are Fred and Jeff Wilpon, the father and son tandem that owns the Mets?

Mike: During Citi Field’s construction, they were committed to building and operating a stadium that was state-of-the-art from a green perspective at that time. Technology has come a long way since we opened and with that opened up new possibilities for us to continually explore. We have inventoried our carbon footprint since 2016. That year, our footprint was 23,839 metric tonnes of CO2 equivalent (MTCO2e), covering Scopes 1, 2 and 3. This includes team and staff travel to and from spring training in Port St. Lucie, Florida as well as fan travel to and from Citi Field. The goal is for us to better understand our footprint and become more efficient in how we go about reducing it, instead of just tackling the buzzwords that may be popular today.

GSB: The fan travel piece is a big deal as it is the biggest contributor to a team’s carbon footprint. Not all teams that measure carbon include fan travel. I know that the club is offsetting some of its carbon footprint through the purchase of carbon and water offsets.

Mike: We’ve done so for the past two ways, through a variety of projects, partnering on water restoration in the American west with Change The Course. On carbon, we’re working with South Pole to provide cleaner-burning cookstoves for women in East Africa. We’ve also invested in wind generation.

GSB: So the Mets have a strong green story to tell its fans. Are the Mets doing so?

Mike: This is where we have the greatest room for improvement. We need to let fans know what we’re doing. Management has talked about it — our concern is not being preachy.

GSB: You guys can do it; there is a sweet spot between not doing anything on one extreme and being too preachy on the other. You can adapt the late, great ex-Met relief pitcher Tug McGraw’s famous “Ya Gotta Believe!” mantra into “Ya Gotta Be Green!” There. My work is done here!

 

¹ I’m a Yankees fan but my dad was a Mets fan. So I cheered for the Cincinnati Reds that day and, if memory serves, went home happy.
 

 

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Post-Super Bowl LIII GSB News and Notes: Eco-Athlete Chris Long Wins Man of Year Award, Budweiser Wind Power Ad 2nd Most Watched Spot Online

The New England Patriots knocked off the Los Angeles Rams 13-3 in a defensive struggle to win Super Bowl LIII at Atlanta’s LEED Platinum Mercedes-Benz Stadium, their sixth championship of the otherworldly 18 year Tom Brady-Bill Belichick era. The environment played a small but, it sez here, increasingly prominent role vs. recent Super Bowls. So before the pro football world turns its attention to free agency in March, April’s NFL Draft and the race to Super Bowl LIV in Miami¹ next February, here is a quick rundown of the Green-Sports happenings that surrounded yesterday’s Super Bowl LIII

 

EAGLES’ CHRIS LONG, FOUNDER OF WATERBOYS, WINS WALTER PAYTON NFL MAN OF YEAR AWARD

While Eagles stalwart defensive end Chris Long did not win a third consecutive Super Bowl ring last night — he played important roles in Philadelphia’s championship in 2018 after winning one with the Patriots the year before — he did earn the prestigious Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year award. It honors a player’s volunteer and charity work, as well as his excellence on the field.

Long’s — and his Chris Long Foundation’s — main charitable initiative is Waterboys, a program that has united NFL players, professional athletes and sports fans to raise funds and awareness to provide clean drinking water to East African communities in need. By February 2018, Long’s goal of building 32 clean water wells, one for every NFL team, was met. Long has now set a goal of providing clean water to one million people.

“I am honored to be named the 2018 Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year and to join the long line of men who have received this prestigious honor,” Long said in a statement. “I am humbled by the support we have received from my peers who have donated to our various matching-campaigns, the commitment and perseverance displayed by the [military] veterans who have climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro with me each year, and the generosity of our fans who have made vital contributions to our foundation over the years.”

 

Chris Long Eagles Man of Year

Chris Long, after winning the 2018 Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year award (Photo credit: Philadelphia Eagles)

 

Click here and here for GreenSportsBlog’s coverage of the Chris Long-Waterboys story.

 

BUDWEISER WIND POWER AD GETS VALUABLE ON AIR MENTION

Budweiser’s Super Bowl ad, “Wind Never Felt Better,” which featured Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ In The Wind” to highlight the the brand’s commitment to wind power, was the second most watched ad online, with 24.3 million views during and immediately after the game. Only Amazon’s “Not Everything Makes The Cut,” drew more online eyeballs, with 33.4 million views.

 

 

 

In addition to that sizable online audience, 100 million or so people were exposed to the 45 second ad on the CBS Sports TV broadcast. And, when the ad was over and the game broadcast was about to resume, play-by-play man Jim Nantz intoned “Budweiser, powered by the wind.” That extra branding, which further cemented the mainstreaming of wind power for a massive viewership, is the cherry on top to what I thought was a solid B+ ad.

 

Nantz Wolfson Romo CBS

CBS play-by-play broadcaster Jim Nantz (l), flanked by sideline reporter Tracy Wolfson and color commentator Tony Romo (Photo credit: CBS Sports)

 

Some ad critics, like Chicago Tribune media reporter Steve Johnson, did not like “Wind Never Felt Better” as much as I did.

Per Johnson’s review, “A Dalmatian. Clydesdales. Amber waves of grain. Bob Dylan, singing about blowing wind. Budweiser trots out all the icons as the horse and dogs are revealed to be traveling through a wind farm. It’s meant to underscore the giant beer’s commitment to sustainable energy, but the message is about as clear as a hazy IPA, a type of beer Bud decidedly is not. ‘Now Brewed with Wind Power,’ says the large type in the ad. ‘Renewable electricity from wind power is one type of energy we use to brew,” says the small [type]’, which you can read if you freeze the screen.”

There is some truth to Johnson’s critique. After all, the viewer has to wait for 30 seconds or so before she/he gets clued in to the Budweiser-wind power connection and that’s too long, especially in this era of micro-attention spans.

Still, it says here that Johnson missed the big picture: An ad promoting wind power reached an audience of at least 110 million people on TV and another 24 million online. 

 

GREENSPORTSBLOGGER TALKS GREEN-SPORTS ON SUPER BOWL-THEMED PODCAST

One final Super Bowl LIII-themed note: I was pleased to talk Green-Sports with Marc de Sousa Shields on his excellent The Sustainable Century podcast a couple of days before the big game.

Marc opens the 24-minute interview by saying, “there are more sports fans than there are sustainability fans and we’ve gotta convert them!”

 

Marc de Sousa Shields

Marc de Sousa Shields, host of The Sustainable Century podcast (Photo credit: Marc de Sousa Shields)

 

I like the way Marc de Sousa Shields thinks!

Click here to listen to the podcast.

 

¹ My way-too-early pick for the Super Bowl LIV matchup is the Philadelphia Eagles vs. Indianapolis Colts.

 


 

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The GSB Interview: Zane Schweitzer, World Champion Surfer and Eco-Athlete

Surfer Zane Kekoa Schweitzer is at the top of his game: Contending for world championships across multiple surfing disciplines, about to compete for a spot on the first-ever U.S. Olympic surfing team, and an ascendant eco-athlete. GreenSportsBlog spoke with the young Hawaiian in December as he was about to compete in the last event of the 2018 APP paddle surfing tour at Las Palmas in the Grand Canary Islands about his career, his work on behalf of clean oceans and more.

 

GreenSportsBlog: Zane, thanks so much for taking time to talk to us in the middle of your competition!

Zane Schweitzer: Thank you, Lew!

GSB: How did you get into surfing?

Zane: Growing up in Maui, I could swim before I could walk. My dad is an 18-time world windsurfing champion and we all, including my mom and sister, basically lived on and in the water. Swimming, windsurfing, surfing, paddling…you name it.

 

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Zane Schweitzer (Photo credit: Matt Schweitzer)

 

GSB: Wow! It sounds like competitive surfing is in your DNA. And you are gaining on your dad as you now have 15 world championship event wins and you’re still only 25. When did you start competing?

Zane: Lew, you’re not going to believe this but I was three years old when I won my first surfing competition. And I was up against kids as old as six. I won a big surfboard!

GSB: I cannot imagine that at any age. When did you first think you could be a world champion?

Zane: Good question. I guess I was 13 when I started to think I could be a world champ. I got more serious about surfing — including wind surfing, got a sponsor and a coach. Then I went out on tour along with my friend and surfing partner Connor Baxter. I was in junior high, traveling Japan and South Korea in Asia along with Spain, Germany and Italy in Europe to windsurf. It was awesome!

GSB: Sounds like it. How did you handle high school while doing all that traveling on tour?

Zane: I went to high school in Maui for the first two years but then it got too crazy so I was homeschooled my junior and senior years, which worked out fine as it allowed me to really focus on my craft and building my own brand.

GSB: Which has worked out well for you. I understand you are a decathlete of sorts in surfing in that you compete and win in a wide variety of surfing disciplines.

Zane: Yeah, most people are unaware that there are multi-discipline ocean sport competitions, the most prestigious of them being the Ultimate Waterman championship, which is eight events. I’ve won it twice and they are the titles I’m most proud of.

GSB: Congratulations! Sounds like the surfing equivalent of the decathlon.

Zane: You’ve got that right. And it’s actually more than just surfing. We compete in long distance canoe and stand up paddle (SUP) races, underwater strength and endurance and more!

 

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Zane Schweitzer competes in the Stand Up Paddle competition (Photo credit: Matt Schweitzer)

 

GSB: What is underwater strength and endurance?

Zane: The underwater strength and endurance discipline — a combination of swimming, breath holding and running with 50kgs underwater — is nuts!! The other events are stand up paddle surfing, stand up paddle endurance racing, prone paddle board technical race, OC1 or one man outrigger canoeing, shortboard surfing, longboard surfing and big wave riding.

GSB: Dang! That sounds impossible. How did your 2018 season go?

Zane: Earlier this year I won the indoor wave pool event at the worlds largest boat show in Germany, that was fun! Was crowned champion of the Santa Cruz Paddlefest and the Ventura Paddle Surf Championships both in the discipline of SUP Surfing. During Race season I set a new record time winning the Maui to Moloka’i 27 mile Hydrofoil race and placed fourth at the 2018 Pan Am Games in Lima, Peru in the stand up paddle race. During the Pan-Am SUP Surf discipline I had a technicality that did me in losing my qualifying position for 2019 Pan Am Games. I was pretty bummed about that! But it was a strong year overall and I’m grateful to finish the APP World Tour in second overall between Paddle Race and Surf combined results and as well as third on the APP World Tour in Stand Up Surf. It sets me up well for 2019 as I look to put myself in prime position to make the U.S. Olympic team when shortboard surfing makes its debut at Tokyo 2020.

GSB: That’s right — surfing becomes an Olympic sport.

Zane: It is so exciting! It’ll be shortboard surfing in Tokyo and then longboard and stand up paddle may be added for Paris 2024.

GSB: All the best! What inspired you to be an environmentalist?

Zane: Ah yes…My lifelong respect for the environment was passed down to me by my family. Growing up in Hawai’i in a culture in which environmentalism is almost a given also has a lot to with it. In Hawai’i we have a connection with nature from the mountains to the sea. Our “kuleana” or privileged responsibility, to care for the land and waters could be derived from the old way of living that was dependent on the health of the complete environment. My dad passed down the pride and respect for “mauka to makai” or “mountains to oceans” mentality to me that embraced this connection to land, water and nature. He would take me dirt biking up in the mountains or fishing in the middle of the ocean far from land and we’d eat and drink off of the land, providing for our family and connecting with nature. It is my ethos. And then, as I started to make a profession from ocean sports, I realized my competitors and I have a huge opportunity, because of the influence sports has, to share these unique experiences and appreciation for the ocean.

For me, the ocean is so much more than a big, unknown world. It is my classroom, playground, church and place of refuge that I deeply honor and respect.

GSB: Very well said, Zane. When did you start speaking out on the environment?

Zane: It really started in 2015. My surfboard sponsor, Starboard, had not been very eco-minded before then, but then they made an amazing flip, a true 180. They partnered with Sustainable Surf and Parley for the Oceans, nonprofits committed to inspiring innovation and behavior changes to help save ocean ecosystems, from our personal day-to-day choices to macro corporate production decisions. I was honored to work with them all and learn how I could adopt eco innovation personally and professionally. In 2016, Starboard invited me to the “Parley Ocean School” in the Maldives.

GSB: …The small island nation off the southern coast of India that is at serious risk now, in real time, from the effects of climate change.

Zane: Youʻre right. This became a pivotal point in my evolution as an eco-warrior and environmental ambassador! For eight days, our group of 16 was taught lessons from people like ocean health experts Silvia Earle and Paul Watson, along with leaders from a variety of arenas. I had a chance to host an engagement, sharing with the group, 1) my connection to the environment through sports and, 2) how I run nonprofit events for kids worldwide to inspire future generations to embrace a healthy, active, and environmentally respectful lifestyle.

We scuba dove together with local climate change experts and saw the devastation to coral reefs and Maldivian islands first hand. It was a pivotal moment in my life.

GSB: Was Parley Ocean School solely a gathering of elite water sports athletes?

Zane: No, it was an eclectic group of influencers that included actors like Chris Hemsworth and Diego Luna as well as Victoriaʻs Secret models, recognized environmental photographer/videographers, marine biologists and more! Ocean school was about sharing experiences, lessons as well as telling stories. The goal was to shift our minds and actions so we would make better environmental choices — and share that approach with as many people as possible.

 

parley ocean school maldives

Plastic ocean waste washed up on the shore of the Maldive Islands during Parley Ocean School in 2016 (Photo credit: Parley for the Oceans)

 

GSB: How did you go about doing that?

Zane: I decided then and there to refocus my purpose towards environmental action and to inspire my community to take responsibility for the health of our environment with our own daily choices.

I committed to making “Blue Life Choices” such as:

  1. Adopting a plant-based, vegan diet,
  2. Only working with brands as sponsors whose values and actions on the environment mirror my own,
  3. Packing my own water bottle and lunchbox to avoid daily single use plastic consumption,
  4. Investing only in likeminded companies as far the environment is concerned,
  5. Hosting beach cleanups on my travels and even during competitions

I also pledged to show off my “Pocket of Plastic Challenge,” a fun campaign I started in 2015 that asks surfers and beachgoers to put their pockets to use by leaving the water and beach with a few pieces of plastic they may have found in the water or sand and dispose of them appropriately.

GSB: Brilliant!

Zane: Then I began advocating against single-use plastics. Wanting to give as many people as possible a taste of the Ocean School, I started partnering with nonprofits like Sustainable Surf, 5 Gyres, Eat Less Plastic, Surfrider Foundation in addition to Parley for the Oceans to spread the word. As mentioned earlier, I only work with sponsors that are the greenest in their product categories. Starboard is leading the charge for eco-innovation in its class. Did you know they plant mangrove trees for every product sold to offset their carbon footprint?

GSB: I had no idea. That’s fantastic!

Zane: I know! I also work with Indosole, a B-Corp that makes shoes out of old car tires…

GSB: …A B-Corp is a for-profit business that is managed to balance profit and purpose, not solely the former.

Zane: B-Corps are phenomenal but having them sponsor me was not enough. I chose to adapt my lifestyle and also my business to continue innovating and inspiring, so in 2017 I started hosting more events — such as Surf, SUP and Hydrofoil clinics — and retreats that included beach cleanups and environmental education. I also published a book, “Beneath The Surface,” based on 15 years of journaling that allowed me to further share with people how to innovate and inspire and live a Deep Blue Life.

 

beneathsurface

 

GSB: What do you mean by “living a Deep Blue Life”?

Zane: It’s the idea that, since pretty much all waste ends up in oceans or other bodies of water, we need to make a collective mindset shift towards making ocean health a priority in our everyday lives. I’ll take it from the words of Sustainable Surf: “We believe that the key to solving most environmental problems, including climate change, is for individuals and organizations to begin making sustainable choices in their everyday lives that are engaging, cost effective, fulfilling – and yes, even fun.”

That’s living a Deep Blue Life. I can help because of my platform. If I see a dead animal on the beach with plastic inside it, I embrace the grief I feel, because there’s nothing more that makes me want my community to stop using plastic bags and straws than when I see these daily conveniences leading to the death of life. After praying for the life lost to single use plastic, I may snap a photo and post it on social media because I want my community to embrace that grief as well, and make “Blue Life Choices” themselves. And, since blue is a key component in the color green, living a Deep Blue Life also encompasses going green — from renewables to EVs to energy efficiency. So I’ve created a tribe of sorts, a following, via the hashtags #DeepBlueLife #BlueLifeChoices and #MyBlueLife.

I talk to high school and middle school kids about the Deep Blue Life — they get it immediately — as well as to corporate audiences through my partners such as Parley for the Oceans.

 

“Zane’s Deep Blue Day,” a 7-minute video, details Zane Schweitzer’s commitment to the environment

 

GSB: I bet the audiences love your messaging. Finally, how much do you engage your audiences on climate change? It is of course intimately connected to ocean health, from sea level rise to ocean acidification to death of coral reefs and much more.

Zane: I try to connect my audience with our changing environment through my personal experiences. I have not yet focused on climate change per se. However I am only 25 years old, have witnessed entire beaches near home vanish, species go extinct, reefs bleached to the point of no return, record rain falls causing deadly flash floods, and islands once lived on sinking into the ocean such as in the Maldives. The phrase, “climate change” may not be a highlighted topic in my engagements, but the message is clear that the actions of humans have caused these accelerated changes and its up to us whether we decide to contribute to the solution or the problem. I’m definitely looking to contribute to the solutions. That’s why I’m happy to endorse a carbon-pricing bill, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, which was introduced with bipartisan support in both houses of Congress in the fall.

GSB: That’s great news, Zane! You’ve joined a growing group of athletes from a variety of sports who are backing EICDA. And I’m confident the lion’s share of your audience of GenZ-ers and Millennials will be happy to hear about your endorsement.

Zane: My hope is that sharing my endorsement as well as my experiences of seeing environmental damage firsthand will resonate with my fans, leading them to take actions that will put them on the positive side of climate change.

 

zane jungle

Zane Schweitzer, in the jungle of Hawai’i (Photo credit: Matt Schweitzer)

 

 


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The GSB Interview with Colin Tetreault: Part II — Making Arizona State a Green-Sports Leader

Colin Tetreault of Arizona State is both a Green-Sports visionary and top-level practitioner. This was made clear when he moderated the Thought Leader panel at the Green Sports Alliance Summit in June. Next up, thought leadership-wise, for Tetreault is a home game of sorts: the Sports & Sustainability Symposium at ASU this winter. GSB spoke with Tetreault in a two-part interview.

In Part I, Tetreault shared how his love for nature and Arizona State University led him to be a sustainability leader in Phoenix city government. Today’s Part II delves into Tetreault’s journey back to ASU, where is he is helping to turn the school into a Green-Sports leader.

 

We pick up the conversation as Colin Tetreault sums up his experience as Phoenix’ first sustainability director and then returned to Arizona State.

 

GSB: Kudos to you and your colleagues in Phoenix. You really made a difference! What did you do after the City began to embrace sustainability as a driver?

Colin: My job was to be a catalyst. By nature, catalysts drive change and then disappear. We hired a Chief Sustainability Officer and moved the full-time work to a great team in the City Management. That, in and of itself, was a statement on how the City shifted from where it had been two-years prior.

I went back to ASU, and that’s when the sustainability and sports link really began to accelerate. We began teaching a Sport & Sustainability class. Dawn Rogers, who was President and CEO of the 2017 Men’s Final Four in Phoenix, came to us and asked us “What should a mega-event like the Final Four do from a sustainability perspective?” Well, we went into overdrive, putting together a Sport and Sustainability Dream Team of state leaders with the goal of leaving a strong sustainability legacy for the city through the power of sport. Our focus was on Zero-Waste, renewable energy credits (RECS) and being water positive. On the latter, we worked with Bonneville Environmental, Northern Arizona Forest Fund, and Salt River Project on an innovative water restoration program.

 

Colin Tetreault 2

Colin Tetreault, Arizona State University (Photo credit: Colin Tetreault)

 

GSB: Were your efforts successful?

Colin: We did good work, especially on water. Even the downtown events achieved a zero waste level. Our energy was entirely offset with sustainable energy production. And we worked in the arena of climate justice…

GSB: Whoa…Whoa. Climate justice and sports rarely comes up. How did you guys do that?

Colin: Here’s how. The games were played in suburban Glendale, northwest of the city. But most of the fan-fest type events were held in downtown Phoenix. Due south of downtown happens to be some the most disadvantaged areas in Arizona. We asked ourselves: Will people from those areas be able to enjoy the Final Four? There were a ton of free events in downtown Phoenix, including the Fan Fest and concerts and so folks were able to enjoy those. And we intentionally engaged low-income and high-minority school districts. The most important question was: How can we empower disadvantaged people in some way because the Final Four was here? Our idea there was to take the total kilowatt hours (kWh) used at the Final Four, multiply that times ten and do that amount of energy efficiency upgrades at Section 8 (low income) housing near Phoenix and Glendale. The plan was to have it funded by the federal Department of Energy (DOE), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and other sponsors The efficiency investment would allow residents to have more money to for education, healthy food, and would positively impact their credit rankings.

GSB: That is BRILLIANT! Did it come to fruition?

Colin: Unfortunately it did not.

GSB: Why not?

Colin: Interest and funding ability wasn’t the hurdle; time was. We introduced the idea in December, 2016 and thus it was too late to do it right by the time of the Final Four in April, 2017. Hopefully, this will be done at another mega-event in the future. But, aside from that, I’d say our sustainability efforts for the Final Four were largely successful. We earned platinum certification, the highest level possible for a sustainable event and a first for any mega-event, from the Council for Responsible Sport

 

Colin Final Four Fan Fest

Fan participating at the sustainability-themed fan-fest at the 2017 NCAA Men’s Final Four in Glendale, AZ (Photo credit: Colin Tetreault)

 

Colin Final Four Fan Fest 2

Poster promoting water restoration projects at the 2017 NCAA Men’s Final Four fan-fest (Photo credit: Colin Tetreault)

 

GSB: Terrific. Council certification is impressive…What was next at ASU, Green-Sports-wise, after the Final Four?

Colin: Major League Baseball came to ASU at the beginning of 2017, looking for a strategic approach to fan engagement and sustainability with clubs. Working together, we created a comprehensive approach for the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies spring training facility, Salt River Fields. We executed a program that included signage throughout the ballpark, social media engagement, a message that ran on the scoreboard from Shea Hillenbrand, standup interviews, a press release from Commissioner Rob Manfred and more.

On another front, we provided a graduate-level intern to Catharine Kummer and her NASCAR Green team. The “Change Agent,” Meghan Tierney, conducted an analysis for Richmond (VA) Raceway that went beyond recycling and tree planting to figure out how the venue could drive incremental revenue by protecting the environment and engaging the community. They plan to present this to track leadership over the next few months.

 

Colin Salt River Fields

Salt River Fields, spring training home of the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Colorado Rockies (Photo credit: Colin Tetreault)

 

We are also interested in the sociocultural impacts and benefits of sport. I mentored another one of our graduate students – McCady Findley – in creating an advocacy activation platform for athletes and leagues. He called it the Chagemaker Platform.

GSB: Advocacy platform? What, is this some sort of social media push?

Colin: Far more than that, it’s an education and engagement model that finds ways to encourage – not discourage – our young athletes to become leading experts in social and environmental areas off the field.

GSB: Oh man, that is HUGE!

Colin: In this age of athlete activism, leagues have two choices: 1) Empower and direct your athletes to act like champions on AND off the field. This will create lasting change that can build greater fan affinity, while concurrently reducing brand risk and exposure issues. Or; 2) pretend that the stone age ended due to lack of stones and ignore to responsibility of sport to be involved in our collective human evolution and suffer the brand firestorms. Need I point to the innumerable examples of late?

GSB: Let’s go with door number one…

Colin: McCady built a platform to educate, empower, and direct advocacy for impact and outcomes…before finishing grad school. My Change Agents rock!

GSB: No doubt! Finally, talk about “Sustainability and Sport,” the event ASU is hosting in January with the Green Sports Alliance…

Colin: We’re taking a broader view of sustainability than what you normally see at Green-Sports gatherings, including taking on issues of social justice and human equity. We’re scheduled to hear from the head of the Arizona Girl Scouts and athletic leaders on social justice. The former Mayor, Greg Stanton, will also be there sharing the power of sports in building communities. Topics like sports and the circular economy as well as regenerative natural capital will be on the docket.

GSB: What is regenerative natural capital?

Colin: It gets into how being “less bad” on the environment is not good enough if we’re going to avoid the worst effects of climate change. We need to be “more good” incorporating the value of nature into our decision and policies.

When we view our natural resources as stocks of assets (water, clean air, material flows) we recognize that we need to not just mitigate their depletion or degradation. Rather, we need to think strategically and in a systems perspective about how to reinvest and grow returns on that capital. While some may think of this as new thinking, even Teddy Roosevelt understood this over 100 years ago by saying, “The nation behaves well if it treats its natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased, not impaired in value.”

GSB: And how can sports engage on regenerative natural capital?

Colin: First, it starts with understanding an organizations impacts and dependencies on the natural systems and society around it. From there, one can better understand the associated costs/benefits and risks/opportunities.

From there, leagues, teams, and brands to make better development, purchasing, operational, and disposition choices that benefit – demonstrably – ecosystems and societies. A framework like that reduces risk and exposure, opens up new areas for innovative purchasing decisions, and advances the organization’s brand in the public eye. I think that the biggest opportunity is the exposure and reach sport can provide in illustrating the importance and value of nature in our business decisions.

GSB: Sounds like the event will be like a fusion of a Green Sports Alliance Summit and NPR! Speaking of the GSA Summit, I thought your Thought Leader panel was also NPRish — thought-provoking, in depth. So put your Thought Leader cap on…How do we amp up what I call Green-Sports 2.0 — engaging fans, especially those who don’t go to games — a much, much, much bigger number than attendees — on environmental and climate change issues?

Colin: You’re 100 percent right. And it’s funny you mention NPR — we have Tracy Wahl, formerly an executive editor there, at ASU’s Cronkite School of Journalism, leading an amazing partnership on sustainability reporting in the Western US. But I digress. The way I look at it, sports is about 15 years behind business in terms of harnessing sustainable strategies and communicating those practices to a wide stakeholder base. That’s not derogatory. Traditional enterprise faced the same issues. Sports is catching up…quickly. I’d also offer that sports has an even greater opportunity to leapfrog traditional enterprise in its impact. People connect on a very personal basis with sports. It’s that reach and narrative – that sports excels in – that will undoubtedly create the wave of change we need.

I like your Green-Sports 1.0 and 2.0 constructs. What I want to know is: What will Green-Sports 3.0 look like? Sport needs to be thinking 30 years out the way businesses does on issues of sustainability, climate change and more. How can sports be bold yet pragmatic? We see that FIFA, UEFA and the IOC are taking laudable steps on sustainability and climate…

 

Tracy Wahl

Tracy Wahl, executive editor of the Regional Journalism Collaboration for Sustainability, at Arizona State’s Cronkite School of Journalism (Photo credit: Arizona State University)

 

GSB:…Like the climate change vignette at the 2016 Rio Olympics Opening Ceremonies…But that’s a one off to this point.

Colin: True, but those groups are headed in the right direction on communicating on environment and climate to fans. They and domestic leagues have opportunities to do more while concurrently creating institutional value, especially since they can appeal to younger people…To get and keep them as fans in the way their elders were, sports organizations need to show young folks that they’re innovating — on the field and off. Sustainability can and must be a key off-field tenet going forward. I’m earnestly proud of our leagues and teams and the work they have trail blazed. It’s not easy, but it’s impactful. It’s that impact that I’m committed to supporting and furthering.

 


 

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GSB Eco-Scorecard #6: Catching Up with Green-Sports Leaders On The Field

Since 2013, GreenSportsBlog has told the stories of the great environmental work being done by teams, managers of venues and athletes. But as far as the sports side of the Green-Sports equation was concerned, we really didn’t go there.

Until last September, that is.

It was then that we launched GSB Eco-Scoreboard: Catching Up with Green-Sports Leaders on the Field, an occasional series highlighting recent on-field/court results of the greenest teams and athletes. Why? Because if they do well, their green messages will gain a wider audience.

And if they struggle? Well, those of us engaged in the climate change fight know what struggle is all about. We can relate.

With that in mind, please enjoy our sixth Eco-Scoreboard.

 

 

ECO-LINEBACKER CONNOR BARWIN SIGNS WITH NEW YORK GIANTS; LOOKS TO MAKE 53 MAN ROSTER

Connor Barwin, the 31 year-old linebacker, recently joined his fourth NFL team when he signed a two-year contract with the New York Giants.

Barwin, who previously played with the Houston Texans, Philadelphia Eagles and Los Angeles Rams, brings much needed pass rushing prowess to Big Blue’s defense (he’s notched 55.5 sacks over his first nine NFL seasons). And he also brings a passion for the environment that has been sorely lacking from the New York-New Jersey sports scene.

The former second round draft pick out of the University of Cincinnati has been very engaged on the environment — climate change in particular — throughout his career. While in Philadelphia, Barwin rode his bike to work, drove an electric car, and spoke out about climate in the community. And, as part of an endorsement deal with NRG, the Eagles energy sponsor and developer of the 11,000 panel solar system at Lincoln Financial Field, the linebacker helped install solar panels on residential roofs in the Philadelphia area and on missions to Haiti.

 

barwin
New York Giants LB Connor Barwin (r), then with the Philadelphia Eagles, helped install solar panels atop the roof of this couple’s home in Cherry Hill, NJ in 2015. (Photo credit: NRG)

 

In a 2014 interview with Jared Shelly of Philadelphia Business JournalBarwin credits his dad with being the inspiration for his environmentalism: “My dad was a city manager who spent two decades pushing public transit in Detroit, the car capital of the world. He had a huge amount of civic pride which carried over to me as a child…It just seemed very instinctual and natural to take care of where you lived.”

With the Giants set to match up against the Jets tonight in their annual preseason battle for New York area bragging rights and the Snoopy Trophy (arguably the most meaningless trophy in sports — the game doesn’t count!), I will be focusing on two players.

As a diehard New York Jets fan, most of my attention and interest will be focused on rookie quarterback Sam Darnold and whether he can take the next step towards earning the starting job for opening night against the Detroit Lions.

And I will also be pulling for Connor Barwin to have a solid performance. He needs to play well since he’s not a lock to be on the Giants opening day roster, although most projections have him making the team.  Assuming he does, Barwin will be able to bring his brand of eco-athlete leadership to the Big Apple.

 

VESTAS 11TH HOUR RACING RALLIES TO FINISH 5TH IN ROUND-THE-WORLD VOLVO OCEAN RACE DESPITE NOT STARTING TWO LEGS AFTER TRAGIC CRASH IN HONG KONG

Vestas 11th Hour Racing, the sailing team with the world class sustainability ethos, got off to a fast start in the ’round-the-world, 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race last fall. Led by a pair of Americans, skipper Charlie Enright and team director Mark Towill, the squad was in a tie for second place in the seven boat field after the race’s first three legs (Alicante, Spain to Lisbon; Lisbon to Cape Town; Cape Town to Melbourne, Australia).

 

Mark Towill Atila Madrona

Mark Towill, team director of Vestas 11th Hour Racing (Photo credit: Vestas 11th Hour Racing)

 

 

Vestas 11th Hour Racing crew portrait. Charlie Enright

Vestas 11th Hour Racing skipper Charlie Enright (Photo credit: Vestas 11th Hour Racing)

 

And the team was near the lead towards the end of the Melbourne to Hong Kong leg when disaster struck about 30 miles out from the Hong Kong Harbor finish.

In the wee hours of the morning on January 20, Vestas 11th Hour Racing collided with an unlit fishing vessel. Despite a badly damaged bow, Towill# and the Vestas 11th Hour Racing crew carried out a search and rescue effort. Nine Chinese fishermen were rescued but one fisherman tragically passed away.

There are no words to describe how the loss of the fisherman’s life affected Towill, Enright, and every other member of the Vestas 11th Hour Racing squad.

But despite heavy hearts and the massive repairs resulting from the severe damage to the boat, the team decided to try to rejoin the race. They did so despite missing legs 5 and 6 (Hong Kong to Guangzhou, China, and then to Auckland, New Zealand), which meant there was no chance of winning.

Still, Vestas 11th Hour Racing rebuilt boat was at the start line for the Auckland to Itajai, Brazil leg. They were in second place coming around Cape Horn at the southern tip of South America, and then the mast fell over.

That had to be the end, right?

Wrong.

The team persevered, fashioning a new mast out of a light post.

Somehow Vestas 11th Hour Racing earned a strong third place showing in the Itajai to Newport, RI leg. They backed that up with another third place finish in the transatlantic Newport to Cardiff, Wales leg. The squad eventually ran out of steam, finishing sixth in the Cardiff to Gothenburg, Sweden race and last in the final leg, Gotenburg to The Hague, Netherlands.

Overall, Towill, Enright and Company persevered to earn a tortuous, costly but impressive fifth place finish.

 

A video review of Vestas 11th Hour’s challenging circumnavigation of the globe in the Volvo Ocean Race, focusing on sustainability and perseverance (9 min 44 sec)

 

Also impressive was this: At each Volvo Ocean Race stopover, the team met with a local non-profit to learn about their environmental work. Sustainability partner 11th Hour Racing awarded a $10,000 grant to each organization as part of their mission to leave a sustainability legacy beyond the race.

Will Enright and Towill make another run at the ’round the world race in 2021-22 and will they partner with 11th Hour Racing? That is all to be determined. The only thing we know for sure is that 2021-22 race will have new owners, with Atlant Ocean Racing Spain replacing Volvo (although Volvo cars will still be a sponsor).

# Towill substituted for Enright as skipper for Leg 4 because the latter had to sit out due to a family crisis.

 


 

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Youth Sailing World Championships Bring Sustainability to Corpus Christi, Texas

Corpus Christi, Texas became an unlikely center of the Green-Sports universe last month. That’s when the Youth Sailing World Championships brought a strong, new sustainability platform to the city on the Gulf of Mexico. It is fitting that leading the sustainability charge in South Texas was a relative newbie to Green-Sports, Elizabeth Kratzig.

GreenSportsBlog, always on the lookout for the next new thing, takes a look.

 

Elizabeth Kratzig has been sailing — and racing — almost all her life.

“I grew up on the water,” said Kratzig. “In fact, in 1991 I competed in the Youth Sailing World Championships (YSWC) in Scotland. Later, I competed for the US Sailing team and medaled in world championships in multiple classes. Then I coached 19 and unders for US Sailing.”

Sustainability? That’s a taste Kratzig acquired much more recently, as she was looking for ways to help her hometown, Corpus Christi, and the Corpus Christi Yacht Club in their bid to host the 2018 Youth Sailing World Championships.

“As a member of the Corpus Christi Yacht Club, host of the Youth Worlds, and an avid sailor, I knew that I wanted to be involved with the organizing committee of the YSWC.” Kratzig related. “I asked myself, ‘How can I assist the regatta?’ What can we — the South Texas sailing community— do differently?’ I began to think about how we could better care for our playing field — the water — as well as the land and air around it. I began to think about how we could make this a green event.”

She didn’t only think about greening the event, she dove in.

So, once Corpus Christi won the bid to host the 2018 Youth Sailing World Championships, Kratzig began volunteering with the Host Committee’s Green Team Committee (GTC), ultimately becoming its co-chair alongside Dr. David McKee. They brought in key people to the Green Team including leaders in local and state conservation groups, leaders from Texas A&M-Corpus Christi and key personnel from city government.

 

Elizabeth Kratzig CorpusChristi_JED_00130

Green Team Co-Chair, Elizabeth Kratzig, addresses competitors about how they can support the sustainability program at the Youth Sailing World Championships (Photo credit: Jen Edney/World Sailing)

 

And Kratzig, like the sailor she is, kept grinding towards greening the event: “We met with Sailors For The Sea, the Newport, RI nonprofit that certifies sustainable regattas, to learn about best practices. Finally, last September, we decided to go for platinum, their highest certification.”

 

LEAVING A SUSTAINABILITY LEGACY FOR SOUTH TEXAS

The Green Team worked with a variety of South Texas organizations, from the Corpus Christi Arts Center to Surfider (volunteers from the local chapter took part in beach cleanup before the event). And Kratzig, who ultimately became the Green Team’s Co-Chair, and team asked Todd McGuire, Program Director of 11th Hour Racing – an organization that establishes strategic partnerships within sailing and maritime communities to promote collaborative, systemic change benefitting the health of the ocean – for funding to help offset costs involved with going green at the platinum level.

Thing was, platinum certification from Sailors for the Sea was not going to be enough for 11th Hour Racing.

According to Kratzig, 11th Hour Racing’s vision goes beyond supporting a one-time regatta: “McGuire said ‘We need you to leave a lasting sustainability legacy, a lasting environmental movement, if we’re going to invest.’ So we went back to the drawing board to develop environmental programs that would live long after the Youth Worlds left Corpus Christi.”

 

Youth Worlds Todd McGuire

Todd McGuire, Program Director of 11th Hour Racing (Photo credit: Jen Edney/US Sailing)

 

When Kratzig and company went back to 11th Hour Racing this February, they did so offering a laundry list of legacy-building sustainability initiatives:

  • Sustainability would be embedded in all aspects of the 2018 Youth World Sailing Championship.
  • The Green Team Committee teamed up with the Texas Sailing Association to use the TSA platform and Youth Circuit to educate sailors about ways to protect their local waters. The TSA pledged to work with Sailors for the Sea and bring Clean Regatta practices to all Texas Youth Circuit Regattas.
  • The Green Team created a sustainability event plan for Corpus Christi. It provides guidelines and resources for other organizations in the area to run sustainable events.
  • The Youth Worlds’ website would feature green content. “This is important,” offered Kratzig. “Only a small amount of spectators follow the race live in Corpus Christi. Most of them watch online so we need to be there with sustainability messaging.”
  • Art exhibits in the city would contain environmental messaging during the month of the regatta, including a chandelier made of over 1200 plastic bottles that would be hung in the Corpus Christi airport.
  • The 2018 Youth World Sailing Championships would measure a variety of sustainability metrics, from electricity usage to waste to water usage diversity. Among other things, this would serve as a benchmark for future Youth Worlds, starting with the 2019 edition in Gdynia, Poland.
  • The Host Committee and its team of volunteers would do everything possible to dot every green “i” at the event. Per Kratzig, “We even greened up our fences, replacing zip ties with more sustainable reusable bungees.”
  • A sustainability report would be written after the event based on Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) standards.
  • Environmental education would be offered to all 381 sailors from over 60 countries at the 2018 Youth Worlds. Since 80 percent of all Olympic sailing medalists have competed in the Youth Worlds, there’s a good chance that some of the participants will, in a few years time, have a big platform from which to share the sustainable sailing lessons they learned in Corpus Christi.

The Green Team’s legacy pitch was a success, as 11th Hour Racing soon became the event’s Official Sustainability Partner.

And, per the Green Team, the event was a success from a variety of sustainability metrics:

  • They were thisclose to being a Zero-Waste event as they diverted 89.8 percent of waste via recycling and composting — the threshold for Zero-Waste is 90 percent!
  • Almost 45,000 16 oz. water bottles were saved by enforcing the use of reusable bottles
  • A solar powered compost machine was used
  • Plastic Straws were banned from many areas around the regatta and all competitors were given stainless steel straws donated by Sailors for the Sea.

 

 

Youth Worlds Solar

A solar-powered compost machine helped reduce waste by composting food scraps (Photo credit: James Tomlinson/ World Sailing)

 

Kudos to the Green Team for fielding pre- and post-event sustainability surveys. This needs to be the rule, not the exception, for all sports events.

 

2018: WORLD SAILING’S GREENEST YEAR EVER

World Sailing, the governing body that serves 70 million sailors and the sport’s 250 million followers, sees the greening of the Youth Worlds as just the latest example of what has become a very strong 2018, sustainability-wise, rebounding from a controversy-laden 2016 surrounding the decision to host of Olympic sailing at Rio’s severely polluted Guanabara Bay.

According to Dan Reading World Sailing’s Sustainability Programme Manager, “Young people really get sustainability. Mom and dad? It’s much harder to change their minds. That’s why we made the environment such a focus at this year’s Youth Worlds. And that’s just a part of our much more ambitious and strategic approach to sustainability over the last year or so. After all, sailors work and play on the water, they understand the power of nature. Most importantly, sailors see what’s happening to the oceans in terms of plastic and other waste up close. They’re sustainability specialists.”

In the last year alone, World Sailing (which, in addition to the Youth Worlds, sanctions the America’s Cup, and Volvo Ocean Race) launched a raft of sustainability initiatives — from boat construction to the significant reduction in the use of single use plastics, from environmentally friendly packaging to diversity.

Climate change has also become more of a focus. “Sailing teams from Pacific island nations like Fiji and Vanuatu see effects of climate change every day,” said Reading. “So we’re measuring our carbon footprint, including the emissions of our supply chain.”

The Green Team decided to measure how their sustainability efforts are playing with participants, team leaders, coaches, and volunteers. “The Green Team approached Brian McCullough, an expert in Green-Sports at the University of Seattle, to assist in developing a longitudinal survey [i.e. before and after] that looks at how attitudes about the environment and environmental behaviors are changing among sailors and fans,” reported Kratzig. “It’s early yet, but survey response rates have been good.”

The upshot? The post-race survey showed a dramatic and positive change in sustainability habits and attitudes. Of those responding to the survey:

  • The event’s sustainability theme resulted in more than 80 percent to stop buying single-use plastic completely and more than 40 percent to recycle.
  • 87.6 percent thought the sustainability focus enhanced the event
  • 95.6 percent would like to see sustainability and ocean conservation at all sailing events.

 

The organization promotes its sustainability initiatives to the sailing media, along with local media where it hosts regattas.

That was the case in South Texas with the 2018 Youth Sailing World Championships. “Our sustainability story got good local coverage,” Kratzig reported. “The Corpus Christi ABC and NBC affiliates covered us as did print and online media.”

Given GSB’s belief that getting media of all stripes to #CoverGreenSports is the most important thing the Green-Sports movement can do right now, a heartfelt thank you goes to Elizabeth Kratzig, her Green Team and World Sailing.

 

 


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