GreenSportsBlog Translated to Japanese; Runs in NikkeiBP

GreenSportsBlog has readers all over the world — thank you, global readers — but our content has not been translated into other languages. Until now, that is. Today, GSB appears in Japanese, in the Nikkei Business Press, or NikkeiBP.

 

NikkeiBP, a 50 year-old subsidiary of Nikkei, Inc., is Japan’s leading online business journal. Thus, it is a great honor that its editors saw fit to run an excerpted version of GreenSportsBlog’s October 2018 story about the passing of Microsoft co-founder, Seattle Seahawks owner, and Green-Sports pioneer Paul Allen in, of course, Japanese.

 

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Portions of today’s Nikkei BP excerpt of GreenSportsBlog’s October 2018 story about the passing of Paul Allen (Credit: Nikkei BP)

 

A heartfelt arigato — or thank you — goes out to Haruki Sawada, Executive Director of the nascent Green Sports Alliance Japan. He paved the way for the expansion of GreenSportsBlog’s reach, and thus awareness of Green-Sports, to Japan. We look forward to additional GSB content appearing in Nikkei BP.

 


 

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The GSB Interview: Lex Chalat, On Where Green-Sports Fits with Beyond Sport and thinkBeyond

Green-Sports is one spoke of the Purpose & Sports wheel that also includes child protection, diversity and inclusion, supporting refugees and more. Lex Chalat began working in that space in 2008 when she joined Beyond Sport, which was just starting out in London, and she hasn’t left.

Since then, she helped the organization become an influential convener and funder of sport-for-good nonprofits around the world. And Lex also has been a driving force behind thinkBeyond — a consultancy born out of Beyond Sport — that “helps organizations and people that do good, to do it better through sports.”

Our conversation covered a wide range of topics, including where the environment fits in the Beyond Sport/thinkBeyond “cause lineup” and how green can become a bigger factor going forward.

 

GreenSportsBlog: Lex, I’ve wanted to interview you for GreenSportsBlog for a long time so thank you! I can sometimes get very myopic about Green-Sports and so having the perspective of someone who looks at all aspects of Purpose & Sport, from gender to refugees to, well, green, is valuable indeed. How did you get into the sport-for-good niche?

Lex Chalat: I was a gymnast growing up in Colorado, so I got the power of sports early on. Went to UPenn in Philadelphia and became captain of the gymnastics team, which was just an incredible experience that has had a lasting influence on my life. Majored in journalism and art history. After graduation, I became a journalist in Philly, working at a small local paper in the southwest section of the city. It was really a forgotten neighborhood of Philadelphia, not well connected to mass transit. The problems were many and serious but there also was a lot of good going on in the Southwest. We only wrote good news stories about the community — which meant most of them focused on arts, music and sports — hey, if you wanted to read about murders in the area, then you’d read The Inquirer! From there I moved to being editor at South Philly Review, which covered similar topics. I also wrote about community development and art for Philadelphia Weekly, including a weekly column called The Edge that told stories about how arts and sports were both gentrifying but also supporting the development of the areas on the fringes of the city. I loved and became obsessed with not only the writing but also community development.

 

Beyond Innovation Summit

Lex Chalat (Photo credit: Beyond Sport)

 

GSB: Did you go into community development?

Lex: No. Instead I got my Masters at the London School of Economics, choosing that school because of its independent, open-ended approach. So I created my own path, studying about unique catalysts for change — like sports and arts — in urban areas. In fact, my dissertation was entitled, “Art Affects.”

GSB: Very cool. What did you do next?

Lex: So in 2008, I saw that an entrepreneur and ex-athlete, Nick Keller, was starting something called Beyond Sport. He had some very prominent early backers, with Tony Blair being the chairman of the Beyond Sport Ambassadors…

GSB: You can’t get more prominent in Great Britain than Tony Blair! He had just left the Prime Ministership at that time, right?

Lex: That’s right. He and Nick both saw the power of the connection between sport, the business world, and society. Not a lot of people were talking about it then, especially not in the private sector.

GSB: Having Tony Blair onboard was a huge coup!

Lex: Yes! He helped Beyond Sport get support from other elite athletes and celebrities of that time like David Beckham, Seb Coe…

GSB: Former world record holder of the mile and the head of the London 2012 Olympics…

Lex: …former NBA basketball star and U.S. Senator Bill Bradley, legendary Olympic swimmer Donna De Varona and more.

GSB: That’s an impressive roster

Lex: I saw that Beyond Sport launched and said to myself, ‘Obviously I’m going to work for them.’ I found out they were looking for an intern and even though I had a Masters degree, I said ‘YES!’ right away. We were a true startup — there were eight of us at the time. Our approach was to connect governments and the private sector to help publicize and fund the most effective nonprofits in the burgeoning “sport for good” world. And we had early success, thanks in large part to signing Barclays as a lead sponsor. By the summer of 2009, we were hosting the first Beyond Sport global summit in London. Desmond Tutu, Australian Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer Ian Thorpe, and Marcus Agius, the CEO of Barclays at the time, headlined the speaker list. Sport-for-good organizations applied for Beyond Sport awards, which included a prize of funding and business support, in categories like Sport for Education, Sport for Health, and the Environment. We covered the cost of all short-listed organizations to get to London for the Summit. It was INCREDIBLE!!!

 

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Adolf Ogi, UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace and former President of the Swiss Confederation, presents the 2009 Beyond Sport Humanitarian in Sport to Archbishop Desmond Tutu (Photo credit: Beyond Sport)

 

GSB: No kidding! So convening the private sector and governments to fund sport-for-good became Beyond Sport’s ‘special sauce’?

Lex: That’s right…And the Summits allowed us to educate, tell stories, and inspire. Since those early days, we’ve diversified and grown, with Beyond Sport United, which brings the major U.S. leagues together to explore how they can make a bigger social impact, Beyond Innovation — focused on Sport-for-STEM, Beyond Soccer, Beyond Rugby, Beyond Sport UK, Beyond Sport Mexico… the list goes on.

GSB: I’ve been to one global Summit and several Beyond Sport United events, although none in the last couple years. And, full disclosure, I was a judge for the environmental category shortlist a few years back. The events I attended were indeed inspiring — seeing the incredible Sport-for-Good nonprofits, like Skateistan, an organization that teaches kids in war torn Kabul, Afghanistan to skateboard, was, well…beyond. What’s been happening with Beyond Sport since 2015-2016?

 

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Kids participate in 2013 ‘Sport For Education’ Beyond Sport Global Award winner Skateistan’s program in Kabul, Afghanistan (Photo credit: Skateistan)

 

Lex: A lot has changed since we first started. First, the sport for good world has become far more sophisticated. Second, the corporate and government sectors are far more interested and committed to purpose than they were a decade ago. And finally, we have found people are interested in engaging in content in a different way. As a result of these three key components, we are constantly trying to revolutionize how we evolve and deliver our platforms so we can continue to benefit the sectors, but also push forward and grow. This year, we’re really changing it up with Beyond Sport United this September.

GSB: How so?

Lex: For the past few years, Beyond Sport United has expanded beyond a one-day conference to include peripheral events – from Community in Action to roundtable, senior leadership discussions. This year, we are creating something called Beyond Sport House, which will be one location that will host many small, vibrant sessions. Along with Beyond Sport United, which will still focus on teams and leagues, there will be pop-up talks here, workshops there, debates across the hall, networking in a corner over there. The discussions will be solutions-oriented, no matter the topic, from human rights to mental health to STEM to the environment. The content will be partner-led and attendees will be able to curate their own itinerary, as well as run their own sessions and side meetings. There will also be a chance to attend affiliate UN week events after Beyond Sport House closes. It will be a very fluid way of serving content and a different way to engage people. Details will be coming out soon.

GSB: WOW! It sounds like you and your team have gone beyond shaking things up! Does this mean the Beyond Sport Awards are no longer?

Lex: Not at all! That’s one of the most exciting things we’re working on this year. The awards will still play a major role, although we are re-envisioning them. There will still be a number of categories, a short list for each and then a winner. What’s new is that we are looking to add two big awards to deal with two big UN Global Goals. One is likely to be gender or social-related and — you will like this — the other is likely to be climate action. We’re looking to get bigger funding and name multiple “sport for good” organizations — likely three to five — as winners of each prize. They will be tasked with teaming up to come up with big solutions to the defined mega-problem.

GSB: So it’s a matter of the whole being great than the sum of its parts?

Lex: Exactly. We’re really excited about this.

GSB: I can see why. I’m looking forward to attending. Now, let’s pivot to thinkBeyond. What is it, how did it come about and how does it relate to Beyond Sport?

Lex: This goes back to 2013. Barclays announced they were ending their partnership but they gave us a three-year off-ramp, which was very generous of them. So we had some time to think about how to diversify our revenue generation because, since the Great Recession of 2008, the corporate sponsorship world was changing dramatically. Getting corporates to sponsor conferences and summits like ours became exponentially harder. On the other hand, many corporations were becoming increasingly interested in ‘purpose’engaging their communities and stakeholders for good, enhancing their brands, attracting and retaining employees — but didn’t know how to do it! Through Beyond Sport, we had the expertise about how to use sport to develop and execute purpose-driven strategies. And we sat at the intersection of hundreds of governing bodies, incredible sport-for-good nonprofits — most of which many brands had never heard of — and government agencies that could help activate those strategies. thinkBeyond grew out of this, really taking off in 2014-15.

GSB: So thinkBeyond is a purpose-driven strategic agency that uses the deep experience developed through Beyond Sport. With whom have you worked and what kind of work have you done?

Lex: We work in three main buckets — 1. Helping corporations and sports governing bodies develop their ‘sport for good’ strategies; 2. Implementing and activating those strategies; and 3. Helpng to position and communicate those strategies. ESPN is a great example of our work in all arenas. thinkBeyond developed and project manages their international purpose-driven initiative, “Built To Play,” in Latin America, India and Australia. It creates safe spaces to play as well as providing access to sport for women, employment training programs and more. Key to the program’s success was our ability to find the nonprofits on the ground in the local areas that made things happen. We also work with SAP on their sport and CSR strategy. The NFL and NHL are also clients we work with on developing purpose-driven content. So is the Qatar FIFA 2022 World Cup as well as World Rugby.

In January we launched thinkBeyond Talent — we advise athletes on how to make the most of their purpose-driven efforts.

GSB: Who have you signed on so far?

Lex: We manage Olympic sprinter Michael Johnson’s foundation, work with Brian Dawkins of the Philadelphia Eagles, helping him develop his new foundation, and Kate and Helen Richardson-Walsh, British Olympic field hockey players and the first gay married couple on Team GB, developing their cause narrative.

GSB: Great work on two counts: 1. Coming up with a smart, sustainable response to the need for Beyond Sport to change its business model, and 2. Developing impactful thinkBeyond programs that benefit people on the ground and sponsor brands. Now let’s talk environment and climate. It’s always seemed to me that green has taken a bit of a back seat to the other areas of endeavor at Beyond Sport. What’s your take?

Lex: To be totally honest, Beyond Sport has struggled in the green space. We’ve never gotten huge interest from our nonprofit and corporate networks on environment and climate. It’s been on the periphery. Since we’re not “Sport for Climate” experts, judging Beyond Sport’s environmental awards and creating our green content have largely been outsourced to the Green Sports Alliance and other leaders. thinkBeyond changed all that, finding corporate clients interested in green, in climate. We helped BT in 2015-16 with their 100% Sport initiative in the UK that got athletes and teams to push for action on climate. We handled their online campaign and managed their activation at the COP21 climate conference in Paris…

GSB: …The conference where Paris Climate Accord was signed.

Lex: We’re also working with Lewis Pugh, the long-distance swimmer, to get corporate partnerships through thinkBeyond Talent. He swims in places like Antarctica to highlight the seriousness of climate change.

GSB: Pugh is an incredible eco-athlete and humanitarian…

 

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Lewis Pugh trains for his 2018 across the English Channel which helped spur the UK government to take action to protect the world’s oceans (Photo credit: Kelvin Trautman)

 

Lex: Absolutely. We’ve done better, green-wise, with thinkBeyond which I think is a sign that people care about it they just don’t know how to activate that interest. But we’re not where we want to be yet. And we’re ramping up, green-wise, on Beyond Sport. In fact, there will be a Global Goals workshop focused on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at Beyond Sport House in New York in September. So green will be featured — along with gender equity, refugees, safe play and more.

GSB: What can Beyond Sport, thinkBeyond, the Green Sports Alliance, the UN, and others do to accelerate sport’s involvement with the climate crisis? Because, per the UNFCC’s latest report, the world doesn’t have time to waste. And I ask this question knowing there are politics involved.

Lex: I think Beyond Sport can ensure there is always a platform for experts to share how they are tackling climate issues through sport; thinkBeyond can do its part by tooling up our strategic services to cater to those who want to develop sustainability strategies – so we can make sure we help them in a smart way; and I think GSA and other experts need to move forward, and go beyond sport (no pun intended) by that I mean: In addition to trying to fix the sports world, we need to work with sports to fix the world. And, as far as climate change is concerned, we need to go beyond greening the sports world, and find ways for sports to green the world.

 

 

 

 


 

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The GSB Interview: Mike Dohnert, Helping to Green Citi Field

For someone who remembers attending his first big league ballgame¹ at Shea Stadium, the then two-year-old home of the New York Mets in 1966, it is hard to believe that its successor, Citi Field, will celebrate its tenth birthday in April.

Built on what was Shea’s parking lot, Citi Field was at the leading edge of green venues when it opened in 2009. Given the advances in stadium greening in the intervening decade, we decided to see how the ballpark and the Mets have kept up. To do so, we went out to Queens to meet with Mike Dohnert, the Mets longtime director of operations.

 

GreenSportsBlog: Mike, you’ve been at Citi Field since the doors opened almost ten years ago. That means you’re the best person to talk about the stadium’s green history and where things can go from here. How did you come to work with the Mets in what sounds like such a cool job?

Mike Dohnert: Well, Lew, I grew up as a huge Mets fan in lower Manhattan…

GSB: …As a lifelong Yankees fan, you have my sympathies…

Mike: …Let’s Go Mets! I went to the State University of New York (SUNY) Geneseo and then transferred to Baruch College in Manhattan. I studied operations management, graduating in 2001. In 1999, I got an internship with the Mets at Shea Stadium, working for the manager of ballpark operations at the time.

GSB: That sounds like a cool internship…

 

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Mike Dohnert, director of operations of the New York Mets, at Citi Field (Photo credit: New York Mets)

 

Mike: Oh yeah! I mean it was sports, it was the Mets, it was great. When the internship ended, my boss, Sue Lucchi, said she needed help. I said “sure.” And I’ve been there ever since.

GSB: What did you do during the internship?

Mike: Anything to do with the playing field and the club offices. Shea was owned by the City of New York; the city was responsible for the structure itself; the electrical, plumbing, etc. So we really weren’t involved in things like energy efficiency. That would change once Citi Field opened in 2009.

GSB: I know that sustainability was embedded in the DNA of Citi Field’s construction. Were you involved?

Mike: Not in the construction phase — I’m strictly an operations guy. Interestingly, the one thing we were responsible for was the maintenance of a 14 foot fire lane between Shea Stadium and Citi Field. The new stadium was built in Shea’s parking lot and the two ballparks were very, very close together.

 

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Aerial photo of Shea Stadium in the foreground and the then under-construction Citi Field across a narrow path in the rear (Photo credit: Mark Lennihan/AP)

 

GSB: I can imagine. What were some of the greener aspects of Citi Field when it opened?

Mike: The HVAC system was quite advanced for that time. Since then we’ve added a building management system (BMS) with sensors to collect energy usage data in real time. The front office was upgraded to LEDs over the last two years — we didn’t go with LEDs at the opening since they were so expensive back ten years ago. Since then, the price has of course come down precipitously so we’re doing rolling upgrades, starting in 2017-18 with the front office and plaza level. And this is just the beginning because we know that, by 2025, we need to be in compliance with Local Law 88

GSB: …the New York City law governing energy efficiency.

Mike: We have an engineering firm looking how to help us get there on lighting with LEDs for the field, concourses, bathrooms and everything else. Sensors as well.

GSB: How is Citi Field doing on water efficiency?

Mike: We’ve got waterless urinals and low-flow toilets. Xlerator hand dryers are big energy savers, from a kilowatt hours (kWh) perspective, as well as from saving on paper towels and reduced maintenance. The club looked into a gray water-water retention program a couple years ago but city regulations prevented it. We are looking at sub-metering water usage which would highlight savings opportunities.

GSB: And perhaps those city regulations will change in the not-too-distant future. What about the green roof?

Mike: The 11,000 square foot green roof is atop the administration offices in right field. It’s naturally irrigated and uses hydroponics. We grow fruits and vegetables up there. It provides natural insulation, cooling the indoor spaces below in summer. It also helps regulate water runoff.

GSB: That’s great. Can fans see it?

Mike: There is a partial view for some fans on the promenade level and so some of fans do get a view.

GSB: One thing all fans can see is a comprehensive recycling and composting presence. Where do things stand at Citi Field?

Mike: Recycling and composting are challenging in New York City. We switched our recycling hauler about a year ago to RTS to help us be more aggressive in combating the challenges. Composting is expensive and there aren’t many places to take it. Right now we compost in the back-of-house only…

 

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RTS recycling bins on the lower right field concourse at Citi Field (Photo credit: New York Mets)

 

GSB: …Meaning you compost organic material in the kitchens but the fans, or front-of-house, don’t have a composting option yet.

Mike: That’s right. Now, with back-of-house plus recycling, we divert about 40 percent of our waste from landfill. The good thing is that along with RTS and Aramark, our concessionaire, we are going to devise a comprehensive recycling-composting plan in the next few months so we can open up front-of-house. Doing so should get us to 80-85 percent diversion. And we’ll be going front-of-house at the same time as we continue to increase our veggie and fruit choices, much of it locally grown.

GSB: Good to hear. Now I notice that there are no solar panels here. Have you looked into it?

Mike: We’ve discussed it for several years. The problem for us is that our roof really isn’t that big. So solar-powered carports might be the more practical play. But there are complexities there, too. As you could tell when you walked to the office, across the street from our outfield wall is a string of auto body shops.

GSB: I’m well familiar with the “chop shops.”

Mike: Well, they’re not long for this world. The area is undergoing a redevelopment and there could be an impact on our parking lots during construction. So it’s difficult for us to invest in solar-topped carports, or anything else for that matter, in the parking area, at least in the short term.

GSB: So it ain’t easy, especially in the short term. Longer term, how committed to sustainability and the environment are Fred and Jeff Wilpon, the father and son tandem that owns the Mets?

Mike: During Citi Field’s construction, they were committed to building and operating a stadium that was state-of-the-art from a green perspective at that time. Technology has come a long way since we opened and with that opened up new possibilities for us to continually explore. We have inventoried our carbon footprint since 2016. That year, our footprint was 23,839 metric tonnes of CO2 equivalent (MTCO2e), covering Scopes 1, 2 and 3. This includes team and staff travel to and from spring training in Port St. Lucie, Florida as well as fan travel to and from Citi Field. The goal is for us to better understand our footprint and become more efficient in how we go about reducing it, instead of just tackling the buzzwords that may be popular today.

GSB: The fan travel piece is a big deal as it is the biggest contributor to a team’s carbon footprint. Not all teams that measure carbon include fan travel. I know that the club is offsetting some of its carbon footprint through the purchase of carbon and water offsets.

Mike: We’ve done so for the past two ways, through a variety of projects, partnering on water restoration in the American west with Change The Course. On carbon, we’re working with South Pole to provide cleaner-burning cookstoves for women in East Africa. We’ve also invested in wind generation.

GSB: So the Mets have a strong green story to tell its fans. Are the Mets doing so?

Mike: This is where we have the greatest room for improvement. We need to let fans know what we’re doing. Management has talked about it — our concern is not being preachy.

GSB: You guys can do it; there is a sweet spot between not doing anything on one extreme and being too preachy on the other. You can adapt the late, great ex-Met relief pitcher Tug McGraw’s famous “Ya Gotta Believe!” mantra into “Ya Gotta Be Green!” There. My work is done here!

 

¹ I’m a Yankees fan but my dad was a Mets fan. So I cheered for the Cincinnati Reds that day and, if memory serves, went home happy.
 

 

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GSB News and Notes: Oracle Park Goes LEED Platinum; Climate Change Forces Move of Speed Skating Race; Nike to Go 100% Renewable Energy via Partnership with Iberdrola

With pitchers and catchers reporting to spring training this week, it’s fitting that we lead off our GSB News & Notes column with a baseball story: Oracle Park (formerly AT&T Park), the home of the San Francisco Giants, just became the first LEED Platinum venue in MLB.

Elsewhere, an iconic Dutch speed skating race is moved to Austria because of the effects of climate change. And Nike continues to push on the sustainability front, pledging to generate all of its energy for its European operations from renewable sources

 

SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS BALLPARK BECOMES FIRST MLB VENUE TO EARN LEED PLATINUM CERTIFICATION

Oracle Park, formerly AT&T Park and home of the San Francisco Giants since 2000, is one of the best places to watch baseball in the major leagues¹. With McCovey Cove in San Francisco Bay beyond the right field bleachers and the Oakland Bay Bridge off in the distance, the vistas and atmosphere are sublime. Oh yeah, and the Gilroy Garlic Fries are simply beyond.

 

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Oracle Park’s famous and delicious Gilroy Garlic Fries (Photo credit: Wally Gobetz/Flickr)

 

Less obvious to the senses — aside from the solar panels outside the right field wall — are the ballpark’s many green features. Hopefully that will begin to change as Oracle Park recently became the first venue in the big leagues to receive LEED Platinum Certification, the highest possible designation from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). It had earned LEED Gold status in 2015.

 

 

Solar at AT&T

Solar panels outside Oracle Park’s right field stands, overlooking McCovey Cove in San Francisco Bay (Photo credit: San Francisco Giants)

 

Moving up from LEED Gold to Platinum for existing buildings is not easy. The structure must be best-in-class in every category imaginable, including water efficiency; energy and atmosphere; materials and resources; indoor environmental quality and innovation in design. Able Services (building maintenance) and Goby (data analytics) were key players in helping Oracle Park make the grade. Greening initiatives included:

  • Demonstrating a more than 75 percent reduction in conventional commuting trips for employees;
  • Offsetting 50 percent of its energy use through renewable energy credits;
  • Diverting more than 94 percent of waste from landfill through an aggressive recycling and composting program;
  • Instituting water-efficient landscaping – resulting in a more than 50 percent reduction in water usage from improved irrigation technology systems;
  • Installing LED Field Lights for over 55 percent energy reduction in field lighting.

“For years, the San Francisco Giants have been steadfast in their pursuit of a sustainable environment at Oracle Park,” said Paul Hanlon, Major League Baseball’s Senior Director of Ballpark Operations and Sustainability. “Through their extensive recycling and environmental efforts, which includes consistently recording waste diversion numbers of 94 percent and greater since 2012, the Giants have achieved the impressive feat of having Oracle Park receive the first LEED Platinum Certification among MLB ballparks, and thus continuing to be a leader throughout all of sports. We commend their efforts, and look forward to their continued growth.”

“We have been committed since opening this park 19 years ago to making it the most sustainable and greenest ballpark in the country,” added Jorge Costa, Giants’ Senior Vice President of Operations and Facilities for Oracle Park. “From the time we opened our gates, we have been working to achieve LEED silver, gold and now platinum certification. We will continue to refine and reevaluate our sustainability and efficiency practices to remain an environmental leader in the operation of Oracle Park,”

 

CLIMATE CHANGE FORCES MARATHON SPEEDSKATING EVENT TO MOVE FROM NETHERLANDS TO AUSTRIA

After soccer, speedskating is arguably the most popular sport in the Netherlands. And the tradition of speedskating outdoors on natural ice can be considered the Dutch equivalent of apple pie in the U.S.

So what to do when climate change results in winters so warm that the Dutch waterways don’t freeze consistently enough to make speedskating possible?

According to “Racing the Clock, and Climate Change,” a piece by Andrew Keh in the February 7 issue of The New York Times, the Dutch have adjusted to the new reality by moving the Elfstedentocht, one of Netherlands’ most iconic speedskating events — to Austria of all places.

Per Keh, the Elfstedentocht, is “a one-day, long-distance speedskating tour through 11 cities of the Friesland province. [It] has been held casually since the late 1700s and more officially since 1909…Covering a continuous route of about 200 kilometers — about 124 miles — the Elfstedentocht takes place only when the lakes and canals of Friesland develop 15 centimeters (almost six inches) or more of ice…That was once a relatively common phenomenon; lately, it has been exceedingly rare. From its [modern] inception in 1909 to 1963, the Elfstedentocht was held 12 times. Since then, there have been three, most recently in 1997.”

 

Elfstendocht

The last Elfstedentocht, the one-day distance race through 11 Dutch cities, was held in 1997. (Photo Credit: Dimitri Georganas/Associated Press)

 

Some wonder if it will ever be held there again. “The chances of an 11 Cities Tour decrease every year because of global warming,” Geert Jan van Oldenborgh, climate researcher at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, told Keh. “That should be a good incentive for the Dutch to do something about it.”

The Dutch have long led the way on renewables and energy efficiency in an effort to reverse the effects of climate change. But because the Netherlands is both low lying and exposed to the see, its people have also needed to show the way on climate adaptation. That goes for speedskating, so the Dutch figured out a work-around for the Elfstedentocht, which translates to “11 cities tour”.

“Every winter, close to 6,000 people from the Netherlands make a pilgrimage to Weissensee, Austria (population 753),” wrote Keh. “Climate migrants of the sports world, they seek the cold and the ice of this town’s enormous, asparagus-shaped lake. Known as the Alternative Elfstedentocht, the relocated race has been embraced by the Dutch, [since it launched in 1989], as the chance to skate the same, staggering 200-kilometer distance (roughly the driving distance between Los Angeles and San Diego) their ancestors did.”

The key difference, aside from location between the original and the Alternative Elfstedentocht, is that the latter snakes 16 times through a 12.5 kilometer course laid out on the lake in Weissensee, rather than running through 11 towns.

 

Alternative

The Alternative Elfstedentocht snakes, serpentine-style, on a lake in Weissensee, Austria (Photo credit: Pete Kiehart, The New York Times)

 

And while the thousands of skaters who trek to Austria are appreciative that the Alternative Elfstedentocht exists and of their hosts’ hospitality, most hope to be able participate in the original at least one more time.

Erben Wennemars, 43, and a professional speedskater, embodies that spirit.

“I’m an eight-time world champion, I won two Olympic medals, but I would throw it all away for the Elfstedentocht,” Wennemars told Keh. “There are a lot of people who have gold medals. But if you win the Elfstedentocht, you’ll be known for the rest of your life.”

 

NIKE PARTNERS WITH IBERDROLA TO REACH 100 PERCENT RENEWABLE ENERGY GOAL FOR ITS EUROPEAN OPERATIONS

Nike Just Did It.

“It”, in this case, refers to the company’s recent partnership with Iberdrola, a clean energy producer based in Spain. The goal is to accelerate Nike’s progress on sourcing 100 percent of its energy from renewables for its European operations.

According Nike’s Chief Sustainability Officer Noel Kinder, the new Nike-Iberdrola team “catapult[s] us ahead of the timeline that we outlined three years ago when we joined [The Climate Group’s] RE100, a coalition of businesses pledging to source 100 percent renewable energy across all operations.”

 

Noel Kinder

Noel Kinder, Nike’s Chief Sustainability Officer (Photo credit: Nike)

 

Iberdrola looks to be an ideal partner for Nike.

The only European utility to be part of Dow Jones Sustainability Index since its inception in 2000 certainly talks the clean energy talk. On the hope page of its website, above the fold: “we are committed to a sustainable, safe and competitive business model which replaces polluting sources of energy with clean ones and intensifies the decarbonization and electrification required worldwide.” And it is putting its money where its mouth is, investing more than €32 billion by 2022 in the electrification of the economy.

 

¹ In order, my five top favorites of the 20 or so MLB ballparks I’ve visited are 1. PNC Park (Pittsburgh Pirates), 2. AT&T Park, 3. Wrigley Field (Chicago Cubs), 4. Fenway Park (Boston Red Sox), 5. Camden Yards (Baltimore Orioles)

 


 

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GreenSportsBlog Imagines a Green New Deal for Sports in Matt Chester’s “Energy and Policy Blog”

Matt Chester, writer/editor of the excellent Chester Energy and Policy blog, posted a thought-provoking story in which he asked practitioners in a variety of fields about what a Green New Deal could look like in their areas of endeavor. He was very kind to ask yours truly to offer some ideas for a sports version of the GND. 

 

Matt Chester’s “Energy and Policy Blog” is always an interesting read, striking a strong balance between “just the facts”-ness and wonkishness.

So when he called to say he was writing a story about what a Green New Deal would look like across a variety of sectors, from higher education to movies to the internet, I was intrigued. When he mentioned that sports would also be a topic area, I became really interested. And, when Matt asked if I would be open to developing some thought starters around a Green New Deal for sports, I said yes in about two seconds flat.

Click here to read his post and some of my ideas for a sports Green New Deal.

For those who’ve been living under a rock the past couple of weeks, the Green New Deal is a resolution that was introduced in late January in Congress by freshman Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY14) and Ed Markey (D), the junior senator from Massachusetts.

 

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Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY14) and Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) introduced a Green New Deal resolution in both houses of Congress on January 30. Standing in the background is Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR)  (Photo credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

 

The GND resolution offers a sweeping plan to make the United States carbon neutral by 2030, upgrade the energy efficiency and sustainability of national infrastructure and private businesses, and create “millions” of jobs in the process. Click here to link to an analysis of the Green New Deal from the February 7 issue of Vox.

It is important to note the Green New Deal resolution is not a bill.

A resolution is a statement of principles while a GND bill (or bills) would be an actual piece(s) of legislation based on those principles. The bill would need to be passed by the House and Senate, then signed by the President (or overridden by a 2/3 vote by each body of Congress in case of a very likely veto from this President) to become law.

 

GSB’s Take: The Green New Deal is at the beginning of what looks to be a long, bumpy yet important ride through Congress. Good going by Matt Chester to broaden the GND conversation beyond the world of politics by getting people to think of what analogous “Green Moonshots” would look like in film, higher education and sports.

As far as the Green New Deal as a policy matter is concerned, I see some great things in it as well as some caution flags. You can be sure that we will examine the plusses and minuses of the GND in the coming days, as well as cover how the sports world reacts to it. And we will build upon the Green New Deal of Sports thought starters we presented today. Please share you own ideas in the comments section below.

 


 

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NYC Marathon Ups Its Green Game

The TCS New York City Marathon is, arguably, the highest profile race of its kind on the planet. Managed by New York Road Runners (NYRR), it boasts the biggest field in the world with over 52,000 runners. Managing the event sustainably is a high priority for NYRR. GreenSportsBlog spoke with Caitlin Cunningham, the organization’s Senior Manager, Event Development and Logistics, to dig into the specifics of the greening effort surrounding the marathon.

 

Marathon Sunday.

If you live in Manhattan like I do, those two words connote the annual, joyous mid-autumn celebration of The Big Apple that is the TCS New York City Marathon.

To Caitlin Cunningham, Senior Manager, Event Development & Logistics for New York Road Runners (NYRR), Marathon Sunday has an entirely different meaning.

She is responsible for managing sustainability for the Marathon. Not surprisingly, that is no easy task. After all, over 52,000 runners race past an estimated one million spectators across all five boroughs on the first Sunday in November, generating many tons of waste, along with carbon emissions associated with getting to and from the event.

 

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Caitlin Cunningham of the New York Road Runners stands atop the Staten Island side of the Verrazano Bridge, starting point for the TCS New York City Marathon (Photo credit: NYRR)

 

“We’re aware of our impact on the city in terms of trash and other environmental issues,” acknowledged Cunningham. “So we have to be creative and work hard to minimize our footprint.”

 

GREENING GOES INTO HIGH GEAR DURING MARATHON WEEK

Runners and spectators begin to see the fruits of the sustainability efforts of NYRR, its partner organizations and several city agencies on the Sunday before the big race.

The Poland Spring Marathon Kickoff five-miler features a partnership between NYRR and City Harvest, the nonprofit that helped launch the food rescue movement in 1982. Since then, it has collected and donated massive amounts of unused food from a myriad of events and other sources to charities throughout New York City. In 2018, 800 lbs. of food from the five-miler found its way to soup kitchens and more.

The night before the race, NYRR hosts a pasta dinner for more than 3,000 runners at the TCS New York City Marathon Pavilion, located in front of Tavern on the Green in Central Park. The organization has a Zero-Waste goal for the dinner, meaning it diverts 90 percent or more of its waste from landfill. With a 2018 diversion rate of 79 percent, the organization is closing on the Zero-Waste finish line.

Then, very early on race day, NYRR and the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) spring into action with a comprehensive mass transit operation. Its objectives are to get more than 50,000 runners to the starting line smoothly and on time, while minimizing environmental impact.

“More than 90 percent of the runners take NYRR-provided transportation options, many of which are added for the marathon, from different points in the city, either directly to the start of the race on the Staten Island side of the Verrazano Bridge or to lower Manhattan’s Staten Island Ferry terminal,” Cunningham said. “About 23 thousand people take the ferry across New York Harbor to the staging area. The nearly ubiquitous use of mass transit is key to getting runners to the starting line on time and also to minimizing our carbon footprint.”

Once in Staten Island, the runners are given bagels and bananas, with City Harvest there to collect the unused food — they also are at the finish line in Central Park, picking up unused “recovery bags”, containing Poland Spring bottled water, Gatorade, Snyder’s Pretzels, and more.

Before taking off across the Verrazano Bridge, many runners shed their outer clothing layers. Prior to 2012, those sweat pants and jackets would be destined for the landfill. But, for the past six years, thanks to a partnership with Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and Northern New Jersey, the apparel has found a second life. In 2018, Goodwill collected 91,000 lbs. of clothing, bringing the six-year haul to just under 863,000 lbs.

That’s a lot of clothing!

 

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Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and Northern New Jersey places collection bins across the TCS New York City Marathon start bridge for runners to donate their heavy clothing before taking off (Photo credit: NYRR)

 

Once the starting gun goes off, the New York Department of Sanitation (DSNY) and private hauler Royal Waste begin a coordinated effort to ensure that, 1) by Monday morning, the city streets show no trace that the marathon even took place, and 2) as much of the vast amounts of waste generated by the runners and spectators is diverted from landfill.

DSNY largely plays the role of street sweeper, gathering leftover spectator trash. They also collect apparel left by runners on the bridges and streets. Unfortunately, those textiles cannot be reused because they were picked up off of the ground, so they go to landfill.

Most of Royal Waste’s efforts focus on recyclables, like bottles, cans, papers and cardboards, with a small amount of composting at this point.

“Royal Waste’s advanced sorting system allows it to do a great job of waste diversion,” noted Cunningham. “They cover the entire course, from the start at the Verrazano Bridge through the boroughs, into Manhattan to the finish line at Tavern on the Green. In 2018, they were able to divert 82 percent of the 222 tons of waste they collected.” That represented a 2.5 percent improvement over 2017.

“New York Road Runners has always made an effort to minimize our footprint on our city and the communities we encounter,” Cunningham said. “Over the past several years we have strived to gain more metrics on our ongoing sustainability efforts so that we can make more precise decisions on the future of our sustainability goals and make our impact even more significant.”

 

BEYOND THE MARATHON: NYRR HELPS REFURBISH SCHOOLYARDS

Sustainability is a year-round pursuit for NYRR, encompassing much more than the marathon.

“One of our most exciting programs is a partnership with The Trust for Public Land in which we transform asphalt schoolyards into state-of-the-art, green, community playgrounds,” reported Mike Schnall, Vice President of Government Relations and Community Investment at NYRR.

 

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Mike Schnall of NYRR (Photo credit: NYRR)

 

NYRR has contributed $2 million to help fund the design and construction of playgrounds at seven schools. Students themselves designed the new outdoor spaces, working in concert with landscape architects.

The seven community playgrounds feature green infrastructure design elements, a hallmark of The Trust for Public Land’s playground work. Specialized plantings and porous pavement help reduce storm runoff that can flood streets and overwhelm sewer systems, allowing untreated water to end up in rivers and bays. Each playground absorbs hundreds of thousands of gallons of water annually and includes 20-30 new trees that bring shade and better air quality to their neighborhoods.

 

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Through its partnership with NYRR, The Trust for Public Land unveiled a student-designed playground at CS 154 Harriet Tubman Learning Center, in Harlem (Photo credit: NYRR)

 

“As New York Road Runners continues to grow, our team will continue its commitment to leaving the communities that welcome us into their neighborhoods better than the way we found them,” Cunningham said. “We have some exciting, new, organization-wide sustainability initiatives and policies in the works and are eager to establish sustainability as a core value of New York Road Runners.”

 


 

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GreenSportsBlogger Lew Blaustein to Moderate “Green-Sports and Its Impact on Climate Change” Panel in NYC on March 11

The event, which is open to the public, will take place at the Princeton Club of NYC at 6:30 PM on Monday March 11th. Admission is $15. Tickets can be purchased by clicking here.

Over the past 15 years or so, Green-Sports 1.0 — the greening of the games themselves — has largely been a success. From LEED certified stadia and arenas to Zero-Waste games to locating sports venues close to mass transit, Green-Sports has become mainstream within the sports facilities world, even if it is unknown to most fans. 

As we turn the page to Green-Sports 2.0 — engaging fans and other sports stakeholders to take positive environmental actions — we have to acknowledge that to date, the sports world has largely been slow to directly address climate change. There are understandable reasons why this has been the case, chief among them the fear of getting tangled up in the politics of the issue.

Yet, given the increasing severity and immediacy of climate change, it says here that avoidance is no longer an option if the sports world is as serious about walking the green walk as it is good at talking the green talk. 

Of course, answering the question of how sports should engage on climate change is the tricky part.

That will be the centerpiece of “Green-Sports and Its Impact on Climate Change,” a  discussion I will moderate with a top-shelf panel at the Princeton Club of New York City (15 West 43rd Street) Monday evening March 11 at 6:30 PM. The panel will consist of:

Dr. Allen Hershkowitz, co-founder and ex-President of the Green Sports Alliance, Chairman of the Board and Founding Director of Sport and Sustainability International (SandSI) and the newly-minted Environmental Science Advisor to the New York Yankees. He is also co-founder of the Broadway Green Alliance and of the Environmental Paper Network. From 1988–2016, Hershkowitz served as Senior Scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), a leading environmental nonprofit. 

 

Allen Hershkowitz J. Henry Fair

Dr. Allen Hershkowitz (Photo credit: J. Henry Fair)

 

Rita Ricobelli Corradi was Director of Sustainability for the United Bid Committee of Canada, Mexico and United States LLC, which won the right the host the 2026 FIFA World Cup. In 2007, she joined Columbia University’s Earth Institute, spearheading a science-based approach in the use of sports for sustainable development.

 

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Rita Ricobelli (Photo credit: Rita Ricobelli)

 

Jenny Vrentas is a senior writer for Sports Illustrated (SI) and The MMQB, SI’s pro football website. She covers both on-field and off-field NFL-related stories. On the latter, Vrentas often deals with social and political issues, although she hasn’t tackled climate change yet. Before SI, she spent six years at The Star-Ledger (Newark), as beat reporter for the New York Giants (2012) and the New York Jets (2010-11). The 2018 season was her 12th covering the NFL. 

 

Jenny Vrentas SI.com

Jenny Vrentas (Photo credit: Twitter)

 

Tickets are $15 and can be purchased by clicking hereIf you are in the New York City area the evening of Monday March 11th, please join us. And if you know anyone who might be interested in attending, please share this post with her/him.

 


 

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